The No. 2 Audi R18 TDI leading a duo of Peugeot 908s

The 79th 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 79e 24 Heures du Mans) was an 24-hour automobile endurance race for Le Mans Prototype (LMP) and Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance (LMGTE) cars held from 11 to 12 June 2011 at the Circuit de la Sarthe, near Le Mans, France, before 249,500 spectators. It was the third round of the 2011 Intercontinental Le Mans Cup, and the 79th edition of the event as organised by the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) since 1923. A test day was held six weeks prior on 24 April.

An Audi R18 TDI driven by Marcel Fässler, André Lotterer and Benoît Tréluyer started from pole position after Tréluyer set the fastest lap in the third qualifying session. The car battled with a trio of Peugeot 908s after the sister teams of Timo Bernhard, Romain Dumas and Mike Rockenfeller and driven by Rinaldo Capello, Tom Kristensen and Allan McNish respectively retired because of separate crashes within the first eight hours of the event and secured the first Le Mans victories for Fässler, Lotterer and Tréluyer and Audi's tenth. The Peugeot 908 shared by Sébastien Bourdais, Pedro Lamy and Simon Pagenaud finished 13.854 seconds later in second in the fourth-closest result in the history of the race and their Peugeot teammates Nicolas Minassian, Franck Montagny and Stéphane Sarrazin completed the overall podium two laps behind the race-winning vehicle in third.

The Greaves Motorsport team of Tom Kimber-Smith, Olivier Lombard and Karim Ojjeh who shared a Zytek Z11SN-Nissan car won the Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) category after leading the final 137 laps of the race. The trio finished six laps ahead of Signatech Nissan's Oreca 03 vehicle of Soheil Ayari, Franck Mailleux and Lucas Ordóñez and seven in front of Level 5 Motorsports' Lola B08/80 car of João Barbosa, Christophe Bouchut and Scott Tucker. Corvette Racing took their seventh class win courtesy of drivers Olivier Beretta, Antonio García and Tommy Milner finishing first in a Chevrolet Corvette C6.R in the new Le Mans Grand Touring Professional (LMGTE Pro) category. An AF Corse-fielded Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 of Gianmaria Bruni, Giancarlo Fisichella and Toni Vilander and BMW Motorsport's BMW M3 GT2 of Joey Hand, Dirk Müller and Andy Priaulx finished the class podium in second and third respectively. Larbre Compétition took the first two positions in the new Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Amateur (LMGTE Am) class with their Chevrolet Corvette C6.R of Patrick Bornhauser, Julien Canal and Gabriele Gardel ahead of the sister Porsche 997 GT3-RSR of Jean-Philippe Belloc, Christophe Bourret and Pascal Gibon.

Audi's victory moved them closer to Peugeot in the LMP1 Manufacturers' Cup and Corvette's class victory promoted it past BMW and Ferrari for the LMGTE Manufacturers' Cup lead. The LMP1 Teams' Cup lead was assumed by Audi Sport Team Joest from Peugeot Sport Total and Larbre overtook Proton Competition for the LMGTE Am Teams' Cup lead. Signatech and AF Corse maintained their advantage in the LMP2 and LMGTE Pro Teams' Cups respectively with four rounds remaining in the season.

Background

The automotive journalist Charles Faroux conceived the 24 Hours of Le Mans to Georges Durand, the president of the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) and the industrialist Emile Coquile for car manufacturers to test race vehicle reliability and fuel efficiency.[1][2] It is considered one of the world's most prestigious motor races and is part of the Triple Crown of Motorsport.[3] The dates for the 2011 24 Hours of Le Mans were confirmed by the ACO on 7 October 2010.[4] It was the 79th edition of the event,[5] and the third of the seven automobile endurance races of the 2011 Intercontinental Le Mans Cup.[6] The race was held at the 13.629 km (8.469 mi) Circuit de la Sarthe, close to Le Mans, France, from 11 to 12 June 2011.[5][6]

After winning the 1000 km of Spa six weeks earlier, Peugeot led the LMP1 Manufacturers' Cup with 55 points, 17 ahead of Audi in second. BMW led the LMGTE Manufacturers Cup with 49 points, 11 points ahead of Ferrari in second and a further 14 ahead of Corvette in third.[7] Peugeot Sport led the LMP1 Teams' Cup with 27 points; Audi Sport Team Joest, Team Oreca and Rebellion Racing followed with a respective 19, 18 and 12 points respectively. Signatech Nissan led the LMP2 Teams' Cup with 22 points and OAK Racing followed in second with four less points. AF Corse led the LMGTE Pro Teams' Cup with 27 points, followed by BMW Motorsport with 26 points. Proton Competition led the LMGTE Am standings with 24 points over second-placed Krohn Racing with 21 points.[7]

Regulation changes

The ACO authored the 2011 regulations to respect environmental and sustainable development in developing new technologies and lowering carbon emissions and fuel consumption.[8] Le Mans Prototype (LMP) cars could now be fitted with four-wheel or kinetic energy recovery system hybrid powertrains either by braking or exhaust or heat generated by the engine and/or suspension dampers. Each hybrid system was limited to 500 kW (670 hp) between braking zones and driver aids such as push-to-pass prohibited. Engine sizes for both turbocharged and diesel engines were reduced and the ACO lowered fuel capacity for both petrol and diesel vehicles. All prototype cars had to weigh 900 kg (2,000 lb) and were installed with vertical fins atop the engine cover to reduce lift tendency.[9]

The second-tier Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) category was overhauled to try and keep costs low and affordable for privateer entries.[10] All cars had to be fitted with a budget-capped production series engine with an engine life increasing incrementally from 30 hours to 50 hours over the following three years.[8] 2010 LMP2 cars could be entered until 2013 but had to be 20 kg (44 lb) heavier than 2011 vehicles with no bodywork modifications permitted and their performance limited to be slower than the current specification cars. At least one Silver or Bronze rated driver had to be signed by each LMP2 team.[10]

The ACO dropped the LM GT1 category and created a single set of regulations based on 2009 LMGT2 rules for the GT Endurance category divided into two separate classes: LM GTE Pro and the LM GTE Am.[11] This was done to avoid multiple calendar clashes with several racing series and because there were few entrants in the class away from the Le Mans race as well as the category being exclusively for short-distance sprint events.[8][9] The LM GTE Pro category featured new cars able to be used by any driver while the LM GTE Am class was restricted to one-year old vehicles featuring a minimum of two drivers per team holding either a Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) silver or bronze licence.[11]

Entries

The ACO received 71 applications by the deadline for entries on 19 January 2011. It granted 56 invitations to the race and entries were divided between the LMP1, LMP2, LMGTE Pro and LMGTE Am categories.[12][13] A total of 40 per cent of the applications were for entry to the LMGTE Am class.[14]

Automatic entries

Automatic entries were earned by teams which won their class in the 2010 24 Hours of Le Mans, or who won Le Mans-based series and events such as the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup (ILMC), the American Le Mans Series (ALMS), Le Mans Series (LMS) and the Petit Le Mans. Some second-place finishers from the 2010 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 2010 LMS were also granted automatic entries. Entries were also granted for the winners of the LMS Green X Challenge. As automatic entries were granted to teams, teams were allowed to change their cars from the previous year to the next, but not their category. Automatic invitations in the two GTE categories could be swapped between the two based on the driver line-ups chosen by those teams. As the ALMS did not separate between the Pro and Am categories, only a single GTE invitation was granted for their class champion.[12]

On 3 December 2010, the ACO announced the list of automatic entries.[12]

Reason Entered LMP1 LMP2 LMGT
1st in the 24 Hours of Le Mans Germany Audi Sport North America United Kingdom Strakka Racing Germany Team Felbermayr-Proton
2nd in the 24 Hours of Le Mans Germany Audi Sport Team Joest France OAK Racing Germany Hankook Team Farnbacher
1st in the Le Mans Series France Team Oreca Matmut United Kingdom RML Germany Team Felbermayr-Proton
2nd in the Le Mans Series France Signature Plus United Kingdom Strakka Racing Italy AF Corse
1st in the Petit Le Mans France Team Peugeot Total United States Patrón Highcroft Racing United States Corvette Racing
1st in the American Le Mans Series N/A United States Patrón Highcroft Racing United States BMW Rahal Letterman Racing
1st in the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup France Team Peugeot Total France OAK Racing Germany Team Felbermayr-Proton
1st in the LMS Green X Challenge France OAK Racing
Source:[12]

Entry list and reserves

In conjunction with the announcement of entries for the 2011 ILMC,[15] the ACO announced the full 56-car entry list and 10-vehicle reserve list at a press conference in the headquarters of Radio France in Paris on the afternoon of 9 February.[14][16] In addition to the 26 full-season entries from the ILMC, the field was composed of entries from the ALMS and the LMS series along with one-off entries only competing at Le Mans.[17] A total of ten reserves were initially nominated by the ACO, two from the LMP1 category, three from the LMP2 class and the remaining five in both of the LMGTE classes.[14] Withdrawals following the 1st February were replaced class-by-class, an LMGTE entry would be replaced by another car from that category and an LMP vehicle would fill the spot vacated by a withdrawn car from the two LMP categories.[13]

Signatech Nissan withdrew its the second vehicle, the No. 27 Oreca 03-Nissan, from the entry list on 12 April, promoting the No. 44 Extrême Limite AM Paris Norma MP200P-Judd BMW car to the race as a result and the Kronos Racing Lola-Aston Martin entry moved to first in the reserve list.[18] The Pegasus Racing and Rangoni Motorsport entries were subsequently removed from the reserve list.[19] On 16 May, the Highcroft Racing team withdrew its LMP1 ARX-01e-Honda car, citing a lack of financial support as the cause, while at the same time announcing the end of their partnership with Honda and HPD due to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. The Kronos Racing Lola-Aston Martin was promoted to the entry list.[20][21] Two reserves remained on the list by the time of the event's start: the No. 69 Robertson Racing Ford GT-R-Doran and the No. 86 Young Driver AMR Vantage.[22]

Testing and practice

For the 2011 race, the test session was reintroduced to Le Mans for the first time since 2008 to allow manufacturers and teams to develop new technologies on their cars.[23] The test day took place over two four-hour sessions on 24 April, seven weeks before the race.[12] There were 54 cars from the race entry and reserves list involved during testing, including three Formula Le Mans-class Oreca-FLM09s from Hope Racing, Genoa Racing and JMB Racing.[24][25] The United States-based Flying Lizard Motorsports, Highcroft Racing and Krohn teams did not participate in the test due to cost and logistical reasons, as well as the European-based JMW Motorsport, Prospeed Competition, Quifel-ASM Team and Strakka Racing squads.[26]

The No. 3 Audi was fastest in testing with a lap from Tom Kristensen.

Romain Dumas set the fastest time in the first session with a 3 minutes, 27.900 seconds lap in the No. 3 Audi R18 TDI,[27] but his teammate Tom Kristensen in the sister No. 3 Audi improved to a 3 minutes, 27.687 seconds in the second session. Mike Rockenfeller followed two-tenths of a seconds behind in second, while the fastest Peugeot 908 car was the No. 8 of Stéphane Sarrazin in third.[28] The No. 2 Audi of André Lotterer was fourth,[29] with Sébastien Bourdais's No. 7 Peugeot fifth,[30] and the No. 10 Team Oreca Matmut Peugeot 908 HDi FAP was sixth after a lap from Loïc Duval.[31] The fastest non-diesel LMP1 car was Emmanuel Collard's eighth-placed No. 16 Pescarolo entry.[29] Oreca-Nissans led the LMP2 class with the fastest time set by Franck Mailleux for Signatech with a 3 minutes, 42.992 seconds lap from the No. 48 Team Oreca Matmut car of Alexandre Prémat and Alex Brundle's No. 41 Greaves Motorsport entry.[29][31] Allan Simonsen in the No. 89 Hankook Team Farnbacher Ferrari 458 Italia was the only driver to go below the 4-minute mark in the LMGTE Pro category with a 3 minutes, 59.966 seconds lap to top the class. Tommy Milner helped Larbre Compétition's Chevrolet Corvette C6.R to lead in LMGTE Am with a 4 minutes, 4.222 seconds lap.[28][29] Separate incidents involving Dominik Kraihamer at Arnage corner, Andrea Belicchi on the Mulsanne Straight with a fractured right-rear toe link, Guy Smith in the gravel trap at the PlayStation chicane due to a broken front toe link led to disruptions during practice.[32][33]

Audi's No. 1 car was fastest in official practice from Mike Rockenfeller.

Official practice was held on 8 June with the full 56-car field on track for four hours.[12] Audi and Peugeot drivers shared the fastest lap until the quickest overall time was a 3 minutes, 27.986 seconds lap set by Rockenfeller in the No. 1 Audi, three-tenths of a second ahead of Lotterer's No. 2 entry. Bourdais was the highest-placed Peugeot driver in third followed by Alexander Wurz's No. 7 vehicle and Allan McNish's No. 3 Audi. Jonny Kane's No. 42 Strakka HPD ARX-01d led LMP2 with a 3 minutes, 42.863 seconds lap from Prémat's No. 48 Oreca Matumt entry and Signatech's Soheil Ayari. The LMGTE Pro class was topped by the No. 55 BMW M3 GT2 with the sister No. 56 vehicle of Andy Priaulx second and the fastest non-BMW car was Jan Magnussen's third-placed No. 74 Corvette despite a dislodged power steering hose. Fabien Giroix in Gulf AMR Middle East's No. 61 Aston Martin Vantage GT2 lapped fastest in LMGTE Am from Flying Lizard's No. 81 Porsche 997 GT3-RSR of Darren Law. The No. 76 IMSA Performance Matmut Porsche of Raymond Narac struck the tyre wall in the Porsche Curves' first part and stopped in the gravel trap and severely damaged the car, stopping practice for eighteen minutes. Roger Wills aboard CRS Racing's No. 62 Ferrari F430 GT2 struck the barrier exiting the Porsche Curves and damaged its front-left suspension and radiator just before the session's mid-point.[34][35]

Qualifying

The No. 55 BMW M3 GT2 was qualified on pole position in LMGTE Pro by Augusto Farfus

The first of three two-hour qualifying sessions began late 8 June night under dry and cool conditions.[12][36] Audi led from the start with a flying lap from McNish followed by Rockenfeller and then Lotterer leading overall.[37] Sarrazin's 3 minutes, 27.033 seconds lap set with half an hour remaining claimed provisional pole position in the No. 8 Peugeot which it held to the session's conclusion.[36][38] The trio of Audis driven by Lotterer, Rockenfeller and Kristensen followed in the next three positions. Wurz was the next fastest Peugeot in fifth after traffic slowed him in the final third of the lap. His teammate Bourdais was provisional sixth. Collard piloting the No. 16 Pescarolo was the fastest driver in the petrol-powered LMP1 entries in eighth.[37] Dumas exited Mulsanne corner at speed and collided side on with the right-hand corner in the door area of Roald Goethe's stopped No. 60 Aston Martin that had earlier spun.[36][38] Both drivers were unhurt,[38] and qualifying was stopped for five minutes.[37] Kane carried Strakka's car to provisional pole in LMP2 with a 3 minutes, 42.615 seconds lap almost 40 minutes in, ahead of Mailleux's Singatech, Premat's Oreca Matmut and Tom Kimber-Smith's Greaves entries.[36][37] Nick Leventis lost control of the Strakka car and crashed into the tyre barrier just before the Dunlop backwards at approximately 195 km/h (121 mph) and at 9.4G,[36][39] littering debris on the track and concluding the session with 30 seconds left.[38][40] The professional class of LMGTE saw BMW lead with a flying lap from Priaulx in the No. 56 car ahead of Gianmaria Bruni's No. 51 Ferrari and Augusto Farfus's sister No. 55 BMWw with the first eight separated by 1.572 seconds. Jean-Philippe Belloc helped Porsche top LMGTE Am from Spencer Pumpelly's Flying Lizard and Giroix's Gulf AMR Middle East's Aston Martin entries.[36][40]

A second qualifying session lap from put the No. 26 Signatech Oreca 03 car on pole position in LMP2

After the first session, Strakka reconstructed its car overnight and changed its programme to provide their drivers the opportunity to acclimatise to race conditions.[39] The IMSA Performance Porsche was able to return to competitive running after it was transported and rebuilt at the team's headquarters in Rouen, Normandy overnight.[41] The second qualifying session saw Sarrazin improve provisional pole to a 3 minutes, 26.336 seconds time and then to a 3 minutes, 26.156 lap. Marcel Fässler then overtook Sarrazin to move the No. 2 Audi to first with a 3 minutes, 25.961 seconds lap which he held to the session's conclusion.[42] The No. 8 Peugeot was demoted to second as the sister No. 7 car improved to third after a lap from Marc Gené. McNish kept Audi's No. 3 entry in fourth with Dumas' No. 1 car falling to fifth and Franck Montagny retained sixth for the No. 9 Peugeot team. Ayari reset LMP2's quickest lap time to a 3 minutes, 41.458 seconds time for Signatech. Premat improved the Oreca Matmut car while Pierre Kaffer moved the Pecom Lola-Judd vehicle to second and third in class respectively. In LMGTE Pro, AF Corse led the session and claimed provisional pole position with the quickest class lap set by Bruni, demoting the No. 55 BMW of Jörg Müller.[43] Similarly, AF Corse's No. 61 Ferrari of Marco Cioci improved the LMGTE Am pole position lap with Horst Felbermayer Jr driving the Felbermayr-Proton Porsche to be second in category.[42][43] During the session which saw several cars affected by mechanical issues,[42] Priaulx lost control of the No. 56 BMW at the Ford Chicane after possibly driving over debris or gravel and crashed into the outside tyre barrier.[43][44][45]

Benoît Tréluyer qualified the No. 2 Audi on pole position in the final qualifying session.

In the third session, Dumas in the No. 1 Audi bettered the No. 2 car's provisional pole lap before Benoît Tréluyer reset the fastest time to a 3 minutes, 25.738 seconds and held first until the session ended.[46] Audi achieved their first overall pole position for five years past 2006.[45] Dumas put the No. 1 entry to join Tréluyer's No. 2 vehicle on the grid's front row while Simon Pagenaud qualified the No. 9 Peugeot third.[46] Nicolas Minassian put the No. 8 Peugeot fourth,[44] Kristensen qualified the No. 3 Audi fifth with the No. 7 Peugeot of Anthony Davidson placing sixth.[46][47] Davidson spun the No. 7 Peugeot in the Ford Chicane early in the session before Kristensen lost control of the No. 3 Audi upon a kerb and went through in the Tetre Rouge gravel trap to crash the car. Signatech's second session lap Ayari's lap was not improved upon and thus secured LMP2 pole position. Kane's lap time could not be bettered by his team Strakka and began from second in category with Oreca Matmut starting third in class.[45][47] Farfus bettered the LMGTE Pro pole lap and the No. 55 BMW remained atop the class until the session's conclusion. The No. 51 Ferrari began from second as the No. 56 BMW fell to third after not being able to partake in the session following Priaulx's second session accident.[44][47][48] Cioci earned AF Corse the inaugural LMGTE Am pole position with an improved fastest lap.[47] The session was halted for 20 minutes when Anthony Beltoise crashed the No. 58 Luxury Racing Ferrari at Mulsanne Corner after hitting oil and Christian Klien in the No. 009 Aston Martin AMR-One picked up a left-rear puncture, prompting the laying of cement dust on the racing line.[46][47]

Qualifying results

Pole position winners in each class are indicated in bold. The fastest time set by each entry is denoted in gray.

Final qualifying classification
Pos No. Class Team Car Qualifying 1[49] Qualifying 2[50] Qualifying 3[51] Gap Grid[52]
1 2 LMP1 Audi Sport Team Joest Audi R18 TDI 3:27.939 3:25.931 3:25.738 1
2 1 LMP1 Audi Sport Team Joest Audi R18 TDI 3:27.949 3:27.697 3:25.799 +0.061 2
3 9 LMP1 Team Peugeot Total Peugeot 908 3:29.466 3:28.739 3:26.010 +0.272 3
4 8 LMP1 Peugeot Sport Total Peugeot 908 3:27.033 3:26.156 3:30.482 +0.418 4
5 3 LMP1 Audi Sport North America Audi R18 TDI 3:28.301 3:27.602 3:26.165 +0.427 5
6 7 LMP1 Peugeot Sport Total Peugeot 908 3:28.796 3:26.272 3:29.464 +0.534 6
7 10 LMP1 Team Oreca Matmut Peugeot 908 HDi FAP 3:30.084 3:30.828 3:31.289 +4.346 7
8 12 LMP1 Rebellion Racing Lola B10/60-Toyota 3:37.404 3:33.982 3:32.883 +7.145 8
9 16 LMP1 Pescarolo Team Pescarolo 01-Judd 3:35.456 3:33.066 3:36.882 +7.328 9
10 13 LMP1 Rebellion Racing Lola B10/60-Toyota 3:38.351 3:34.892 3:34.573 +8.835 10
11 15 LMP1 OAK Racing OAK Pescarolo 01-Judd 3:39.672 3:34.933 3:35.543 +9.195 11
12 22 LMP1 Kronos Racing Lola-Aston Martin B09/60 3:44.415 3:36.551 3:37.528 +10.813 12
13 20 LMP1 Quifel-ASM Team Zytek 09SC 3:41.019 3:37.393 3:37.785 +11.655 13
14 26 LMP2 Signatech Nissan Oreca 03-Nissan 3:43.124 3:41.458 3:46.710 +15.720 14
15 24 LMP1 OAK Racing OAK Pescarolo 01-Judd 3:48.852 3:41.908 3:46.327 +16.170 15
16 42 LMP2 Strakka Racing HPD ARX-01d 3:42.615 3:45.041 No Time +16.877 16
17 48 LMP2 Team Oreca Matmut Oreca 03-Nissan 3:43.654 3:43.098 3:43.438 +17.360 17
18 39 LMP2 Pecom Racing Lola B11/40-Judd BMW 3:45.997 3:43.223 3:45.476 +17.485 18
19 49 LMP2 OAK Racing OAK Pescarolo 01-Judd BMW 3:48.211 3:45.297 3:43.479 +17.741 19
20 41 LMP2 Greaves Motorsport Z11SN-Nissan 3:43.814 3:45.982 3:43.802 +18.064 20
21 40 LMP2 Race Performance Oreca 03-Judd BMW 3:44.294 3:48.603 3:45.476 +18.556 21
22 007 LMP1 Aston Martin Racing Aston Martin AMR-One 3:56.847 3:46.450 3:45.918 +20.180 22
23 36 LMP2 RML HPD ARX-01d 3:47.308 3:48.765 3:48.324 +21.570 23
24 5 LMP1 Hope Racing Oreca Swiss HY Tech-Hybrid 3:47.691 3:50.495 No Time +21.953 24
25 009 LMP1 Aston Martin Racing Aston Martin AMR-One 3:56.637 3:48.355 3:57.025 +22.617 25
26 44 LMP2 Extrême Limite AM Paris Norma MP200P-Judd BMW 3:51.438 3:48.420 4:08.626 +22.682 26
27 35 LMP2 OAK Racing OAK Pescarolo 01-Judd BMW 3:57.453 3:48.665 3:53.008 +22.927 27
28 33 LMP2 Level 5 Motorsports Lola B08/80-HPD 3:51.149 3:57.072 3:48.863 +23.125 28
29 55 LM GTE Pro BMW Motorsport BMW M3 GT2 3:59.321 3:59.426 3:57.592 +31.854 29
30 51 LM GTE Pro AF Corse SRL Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 3:58.989 3:58.040 3:58.454 +32.302 30
31 56 LM GTE Pro BMW Motorsport BMW M3 GT2 3:58.426 4:01.190 No Time +32.688 31
32 74 LM GTE Pro Corvette Racing Chevrolet Corvette C6.R 3:59.519 4:00.087 4:00.535 +33.781 32
33 89 LM GTE Pro Hankook Team Farnbacher Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 4:00.260 3:59.519 4:00.845 +33.781 33
34 73 LM GTE Pro Corvette Racing Chevrolet Corvette C6.R 3:59.633 4:01.626 4:03.800 +33.895 34
35 77 LM GTE Pro Team Felbermayr-Proton Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 3:59.998 3:59.662 4:06.917 +33.924 35
36 59 LM GTE Pro Luxury Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 3:59.901 4:01.015 No Time +34.163 36
37 75 LM GTE Pro Prospeed Competition Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 3:59.962 4:03.521 4:04.143 +34.224 37
38 79 LM GTE Pro Jota Aston Martin V8 Vantage GT2 4:00.747 4:00.921 4:06.208 +35.009 38
39 66 LM GTE Pro JMW Motorsport Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 4:06.884 4:00.890 4:03.321 +35.152 39
40 80 LM GTE Pro Flying Lizard Motorsports Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 4:01.480 4:03.128 4:01.024 +35.286 40
41 58 LM GTE Pro Luxury Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 4:02.017 4:01.176 4:03.940 +35.438 41
42 61 LM GTE Am AF Corse SRL Ferrari F430 GTE 4:10.316 4:02.539 4:01.282 +35.544 42
43 88 LM GTE Pro Team Felbermayr-Proton Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 4:02.049 4:03.613 4:01.752 +36.014 43
44 71 LM GTE Am AF Corse SRL Ferrari F430 GTE 4:08.213 4:02.216 4:18.744 +36.478 44
45 76 LM GTE Am IMSA Performance Matmut Porsche 997 GT3-RSR No Time 4:06.438 4:02.548 +36.810 45
46 63 LM GTE Am Proton Competition Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 4:05.154 4:03.532 No Time +37.794 46
47 81 LM GTE Am Flying Lizard Motorsports Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 4:04.747 4:05.440 4:03.648 +37.910 47
48 70 LM GTE Am Larbre Compétition Porsche 997 GT3-RSR 4:03.918 4:07.261 4:13.895 +38.180 48
49 83 LM GTE Am JMB Racing Ferrari F430 GTE 4:10.335 4:06.513 4:04.640 +38.902 49
50 60 LM GTE Am Gulf AMR Middle East Aston Martin V8 Vantage GT2 4:04.825 4:05.522 4:08.922 +39.087 50
51 57 LM GTE Am Krohn Racing Ferrari F430 GTE 4:05.856 4:08.388 4:05.211 +39.473 51
52 50 LM GTE Am Larbre Compétition Chevrolet Corvette C6.R 4:05.955 4:26.036 4:13.623 +40.217 52
53 62 LM GTE Am CRS Racing Ferrari F430 GTE 4:26.249 4:07.236 4:18.494 +41.498 53
54 65 LM GTE Pro Lotus Jetalliance Lotus Evora GTE 4:07.465 No Time No Time +41.727 54
55 68 LM GTE Am Robertson Racing LLC Ford GT-R Mk. VII No Time 4:08.208 4:11.421 +42.470 55
56 64 LM GTE Pro Lotus Jetalliance Lotus Evora GTE 4:17.379 4:12.569 4:26.142 +46.831 56

Warm-up

The drivers had a 45-minute warm-up session at 09:00 local time on 11 June in cloudy conditions without rain.[12][53] Bourdais' No. 9 Peugeot recorded the fastest lap of 3 minutes, 27.228 seconds just before the session's end. Pole position qualifier Tréluyer was second-fastest with his Audi teammates Timo Bernhard and Kristensen third and fourth.[54][55] The quickest LMP2 lap was a 3 minutes, 43.449 seconds set by Mallieux's Signatech entry. AF Corse's LMGTE Pro-category Ferrari of Toni Vilander led the class while Niclas Jönsson's Krohn Ferrari led LMGTE Am.[53][55] Rui Águas stopped AF Corse's No. 71 Ferrari at Mulsanne corner with a suspected differential issue. Kaffer went straight on at Arnage turn and restarted the Pecom car to continue his race preparations.[53]

Race

Start to early evening

Both of the Aston Martin AMR-One LMP1 cars were retired in the first hour of the event

Pre-race weather was dry and clear with the air temperature between 8 and 18 °C (46 and 64 °F) and the track temperature from 14.5 to 28.6 °C (58.1 to 83.5 °F).[56][57] The race, which was attended by 249,500,[58] started at 15:00 local time with Jean Todt, the FIA president, waving the French Tricolour from the starter's gantry to begin proceedings.[57][59] The 56-car field was led by Tréluyer for the first ten laps.[56][57] His teammate McNish overtook Bourdais for fourth before the Mulsanne Straight and then Montagny on the outside at the PlayStation chicane after a five-lap battle that saw Montagny put McNish towards the pit lane barrier.[60] Aston Martin Racing lost both of its LMP1-class AMR Ones during the first hour when Darren Turner lost control of the No. 009 entry and beached it in the first Mulsanne chicane gravel and Adrián Fernández brought the No. 007 car into the garage with unrepairable broken engine aluminium alternator pulleys breaking the pulley-linked drive alternator and water pump gear.[61][62] Bruni moved Ferrari's No. 51 car to the LMGTE Pro lead followed by Oliver Gavin's No. 74 Corvette to second after passing Farfus. Gavin held off Farfus on the Mulsanne Straight in the following laps before Farfus re-overtook him for second in class.[60]

Mallieux's Signatech car forfeited the LMP2 lead it had held since the start to Prémat's No. 48 Oreca entry after 34 minutes because of a left-rear puncture causing bodywork damage.[63][64] The first hour ended with McNish passing Bernhard's slowing No. 1 Audi for the lead on the inside past the Dunlop Bridge before Beltoise was caught off guard and hit the No. 3 car's rear in the high speed right-hand Esses.[62][65] McNish' went through the gravel backwards and struck the outside tyre wall at a gap allowing cars to be moved to a safer location beyond the gravel at high speed and landed upside down on its side.[60][66] The impact destroyed the Audi and sent debris flying across a group of photographers through the inside catch fence.[62][65] The marshals turned the Audi upright and McNish exited it unhurt.[63] McNish was transported to the infield medical centre and then to a local hospital for checks clearing him.[67] The safety cars were deployed for 72 minutes as marshals worked to repair the damaged walls.[57] Under safety car conditions, Montagny brought the No. 8 Peugeot into the garage earlier than scheduled to rectify a stuck vehicle brake balance distribution unit in the rearmost area and it rejoined the race in eighth with Sarrazin driving.[63][68][69]

When racing resumed, Nick Tandy in the No. 88 Felbermayr Porsche was lapping faster than Corvette's Olivier Beretta and overtook him for second in LMGTE Pro.[70][71] Tréluyer maintained the lead until a pit stop cycle saw his teammate Bernhard temporarily move past him since the cars made pit stops in numerical order. Bernhard had driven over a kerb damaging the No. 1 Audi's nose line while lapping a slower GT car, reducing the amount of available downforce. Tréluyer and Wurz demoted Bernhard to third following separate overtakes on the Mulsanne Straight. Audi brought the No. 1 car into the pit lane for a replacement front nose and Bernhard fell to fifth.[70][72] LMP2 became a duel for first between Prémat and later Kraihamer's Oreca and the Strakka car of Danny Watts, who was drawing closer to the Oreca.[73][74] Jörg Müller relinquished the No. 55 BMW's hold on third in LMGTE Pro due to a right-rear puncture requiring it to enter the garage,[75] and dropped two laps behind the class leader.[73][74] Pagenaud lost control of the No. 9 Peugeot and went straight at Arnage turn, causing him to steer the car around in order to rejoin the circuit.[73][74]

Davidson took over the race lead in the No. 7 Porsche from Fässler's No. 2 Audi courtesy of his car been able to drive longer between pit stops.[57] Dumas was recovering lost ground in the No. 1 Audi when he lost control of it lapping the LMGTE Am-class No. 71 Porsche on the inside at Tetre Rouge; he maintained the car's hold on fourth.[76][77] AF Corse saw their hold on third in LMGTE Pro ceded to Antonio García in the No. 73 Corvette when Vilander drove straight into the gravel trap at Mulsanne Corner and required trackside recovery to enable the Ferrari's return to the circuit. Matías Russo was able to pass Leventis' Strakka entry and moved into third position in LMP2. The No. 7 Peugeot of Davidson and the No. 2 Audi of Fässler exchanged the race lead during the sixth hour until Fässler was able to establish a minute's lead over the remainder of the field.[57][78] LMGTE Am became a tight duel with the distance between the class leader and sixth in category just more than a minute due to the track's length and involved the Flying Lizard, Krohn, AF Corse and Larbre teams.[75]

Night to dawn

As night began to fall,[57] Rockenfeller in the No. 1 Audi overtook Lamy in the No. 9 Peugeot for third after Lamy's car had been affected by a repeating door flapping open as Lotterer and Gené continued to duel for the race lead.[79] Priaulx relinquished the No. 56 BMW's hold on second in LMGTE Pro due to an engine misfire requiring switch of engine control unit and ignition coil.[80] LMGTE Am saw the two Larbre entries in the No. 70 Corvette and the No. 50 Porsche duel for the category lead with the Corvette consistently lapping faster than the Porsche.[57] Gené fell back from Lotterer in the duel for the overall lead and the No. 7 Peugeot was put under pressure by Rockenfeller's No. 1 Audi that overtook him for second by causing Gené to drift wide onto the Arnage corner run-off area and lose 30 seconds in the eighth hour.[57][81] Not long after, Rockenfeller was lapping the No. 71 Ferrari of Rob Kauffman at the second kink on the straight linking Mulsanne and Indianapolis corner when Kauffman went into Rockenfeller's path and made contact with the rear of the No. 1 Audi. Rockenfeller's car was sent spearing left into the Armco barrier at high speed,[62][65] destroying the Audi, around 20 metres (66 ft) of barrier and the car went back across the circuit,[59][82] littering a plethora of debris on it.[83] The ACO ordered Kauffman to not partake in the remainder of the race,[65] and Rockenfeller was kept in hospital overnight with a minor right arm flesh wound.[84]

The LMP2-category winning No. 48 Zytek Z11SN entered by Greaves Motorsport and piloted by Tom Kimber-Smith, Olivier Lombard and Karim Ojjeh

The safety cars were deployed for the second time to allow marshals to repair the damaged Armco barrier and remove debris for 2 hours, 22 minutes.[57] All of the leading prototype cars were driven into the pit lane for full-service pit stops.[81] CRS brought their No. 62 Ferrari into the garage to be retired due to driver Shaun Lynn damaging the vehicle's right-rear corner heavily against the Ford Chicane barrier after losing control turning into the corner. The resulting damage saw bodywork jammed the right-rear wheel against the fuel cell, causing an oil leak repaired by Lynn before the car's clutch burned out.[85][86] When racing resumed, the sole-remaining No. 2 Audi and the three Peugeots exchanged the lead several times over the following hours during pit stop cycles.[65] Prémat relinquished the LMP2 lead that the No. 48 Oreca had maintained for 96 laps in succession to the Greaves entry of Olivier Lombard because of electrical issues forcing the Oreca's moving into the garage.[57][87] Second in both LMGTE classes saw four drivers within twelve seconds of each other in Pro and three competitors within three seconds of one another in Am. Watts moved the Strakka LMP2 car to second in category with successive overtakes on Russo and Kraihamer.[88]

The LMP2 category saw two cars running in the top three retiring. Russo lost control of the third-placed Pecom car through the Porsche Curves and it suddenly speared right into the barrier.[57][88] Watts in the Strakka entry made contact with a kerb and the car sustained damage to its front aerodynamics. A change of front nose cone during a pit stop rectified the problem before Watts smelt oil and stopped the car because of a suspected oil cooler issue at the first Mulsanne chicane before abandoning the car after telemetry determined that it should not be restarted.[57][89] Kraihamer was lapping faster than Karim Ojjeh's No. 41 Greaves car and overtook him to reclaim the LMP2 lead in the No. 48 Oreca since the entry had made one fewer pit stop.[90] Ayari brought the Signatech car to third in category when he passed João Barbosa as the Nos. 7 and 8 Peugeot twice exchanged third overall during a pit stop cycle.[91] Pagenaud and his teammate Davidson were able to close up to Fässler in the No. 2 Audi and took the first two positions in the race just before the safety cars were deployed for the third time. Jean-Christophe Boullion substantially damaged the front of the No. 13 Rebellion in an accident at the Porsche Curves; marshals were required to remove the car and clear debris in the accident area. Boullion was unhurt.[57]

As racing continued in the early morning, the first three entries were all close together.[62] Fässler moved from third to the race lead after a pit stop cycle before losing the advantage when Davidson overtook him on the inside entering Indianapolis corner. Davidson was pressured by Fässler through the Porsche Curves and the former flat-spotted the front wheels on the No. 7 Peugeot when he locked them at the first Mulsanne chicane enabled Fässler to reclaim first place.[57][92] The safety cars were deployed for the fourth time when Christophe Bourret beached the No. 70 Larbre Porsche in the edge of the gravel in the Porsche Curves and reversed to return to the track. Stéphane Ortelli then stopped the No. 59 Ferrari on the track and required assistance from marshals and trackside equipment for recovery.[57] During the safety car period, David Hallyday in the second-placed No. 48 Oreca LMP2 entry went straight on at Arnage corner and damaged the car's front-right corner in an attempt to retain tyre temperature.[62][93] Hallyday abandoned the car on the run-off area and it was transported to the pit lane on a flatbed truck.[57] The Oreca's retirement promoted Mallieux's No. 28 Signatech car to second in LMP2 and Christophe Bouchut's No. 33 Level 5 Motorsports entry to third in category.[57][93]

Morning to finish

Beretta, who was combating carbon monoxide poisoning from inhaling fumes during earlier safety car periods,[94] missed his point to brake for Arnage corner and he went straight into the turn's tyre barrier with the front of the No. 73 Corvette. He reversed the car and rejoined the circuit retaining third in LMGTE Pro. The No. 81 Flying Lizard Porsche of Seth Neiman ran wide into the gravel at Mulsanne and was forced to temporarily relinquish the lead of LMGTE Am to the No. 50 Larbre driven by Gabriele Gardel when it entered the garage with liquids leaking from the car's rear. Neiman was then relieved by Pumpelly and battled Gardel for the category lead until Gardel claimed the position.[57][95] Magnussen in Corvette's No, 73 LMGTE Pro-leading car was lapping the No. 63 LMGTE Am-category Proton Porsche of Horst Felbermayr on the inside when he lost control of the car's rear.[62][95][96] He struck the side of Felbermayr's car and sent both vehicles into the barrier before ricocheting back across the wall on the circuit's other side. The accident forced the retirement of both the Corvette and Porsche and Vilander's No. 51 Ferrari was promoted to the LMGTE Pro lead with Beretta's No. 63 Corvette second.[57]

The safety cars were deployed for the fifth time and marshals spent 29 minutes clearing debris in the accident area and recovery vehicles were used to extricate the damaged vehicles.[57] Following the resumption of racing, the No. 7 and 8 Peugeots were released from the pit lane a lap before the No. 2 Audi of Tréluyer that was at the back of the nearest safety car's queue.[97] Pagenaud took the race lead from Tréluyer before the latter was able to reclaim the position on the outside entering the second Mulsanne chicane and pulled away with a series of fastest laps.[98] The No. 8 Peugeot of Sarrazin was assessed a one-minute stop-and-go penalty since the team member holding the refuelling hose had an improperly placed visor when fuel was added to the car,[99] losing a lap to the race leader.[57] In the 19th hour, Wurz missed the apex for Indianapolis corner and went straight on.[99][57] He made light contact with the tyre barrier at the exit of the turn and the No. 7 Peugeot received with heavy damage to its front-right corner and a wobbling right-front wheel on a hub. The car was extricated by a tractor and was recovered to the garage, where it lost four laps to the race leaders due to repairs to its front suspension.[99][100]

The LMGTE Pro-category winning No. 73 Chevrolet Corvette C6.R driven by Olivier Beretta, Antonio García and Tommy Milner

Light rain began to fall on parts of the circuit at the 19th hour's end and increased in intensity not long after; it was not heavy enough to affect proceedings.[99] Tréluyer approached the rear of the lapped Davidson and was blocked from further lapping the No. 7 Peugeot due to it blocking his path and removing downforce from Audi's No. 2 car going off the racing line. Audi told Tréluyer to slow and not put a further lap on Davidson.[101][102] Lotterer relieved Tréluyer during a routine pit stop before the No. 2 Audi was again slowed by a Peugeot, this time by Montagny's No. 8 entry before being lapped at Mulsanne turn.[103] García's No. 73 Corvette took the LMGTE Pro lead after Ferrari's No. 51 entry was unable to immediately restart due to clutch and electrical problems when driver Vilander attempted to drive away from a pit box.[101][103] Rain returned to the track during the 22nd hour and some cars were caught out by the change in conditions.[104] Kimber-Smith lost control of the Greaves Zytek car and temporarily beached the car in the gravel at the Dunlop S before recovering with assistance without losing the LMP2 lead. Collard crashed the No. 16 Pescarolo 01 into the tyre barrier entering the Porsche Curves and the car retired from fifth.[57][105]

In the 23rd hour, Lotterer was delayed by the fourth-placed Gené whom he was attempting to lap and the two drivers made contact into the second chicane on the Mulsanne Straight. Lotterer was able to lap Gené after Mulsanne turn. Robertson Racing's No. 68 Ford GT was promoted to third in LMGTE Am after the JMB Racing Ferrari had to twice enter the garage for clutch repairs.[106][107] The circuit had become completely dry by the final hour's start.[108] Lotterer was forced to make an extra pit stop for four new tyres and fuel with fewer than 40 minutes remaining after Audi noticed the No. 2 car's left-rear tyre was slowly deflating.[62][109] Race control decided that there would be no traditional slow lap to finish the race with flag waving by marshals but a full lap at slow speed would occur after the first car had completed the event instead.[57][108] Pascale Gibson in the second-placed LMGTE Am Larbre Porsche crashed into a tyre wall though he was able to recover without relinquishing the position.[108]

The race-winning No. 2 Audi of Marcel Fässler, André Lotterer and Tréluyer

Lotterer was able to pull way from the No. 9 Peugeot by responding to the car's fast pace in the final half-hour,[110] and the No. 2 Audi was the first to finish after 355 laps,[111] achieving the first Le Mans win for Lotterer, Fässler and Tréluyer and Audi's tenth.[112] Their lead engineer, Leena Gade, was the first female race engineer to win the event.[113] Pagenaud followed 13.854 seconds later in the No. 9 Peugeot in second for the fourth-closest recorded Le Mans finish and the No. 8 Peugeot driven the headache-affected and visually affected Minassian due to overnight car vibrations completed the podium two laps behind in third.[109] Greaves was undaunted for the final 137 laps in LMP2 and drivers Kimber-Smith, Lombard and Ojjeh claimed their first class wins and Nissan's first since 2000.[56][111][112] Signatech were six laps behind in second and Level 5 took third on their Le Mans debut.[111] Corvette Racing held their lead in LMGTE Pro, earning the team their seventh category win and Milner's maiden class victory, García's fourth and Beretta's sixth.[111][112] AF Corse took their first Le Mans class podium with the No. 51 Ferrari second and BMW's No. 56 car was third.[109][112] Corvette also won in LMGTE Am with Larbre achieving their sixth category win with the No. 50 Corvette ahead of the sister No. 70 Corvette and Robertson's Ford GT. On David and Andrea Robertson's wedding anniversary, the two became the first married couple to finish on the podium.[111][112]

Post-race

The podium for the top three overall race finishers

The top three teams in each of the four classes appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and spoke to the media in the later press conferences.[12] Fässler described how he felt when he observed his co-drivers duel Peugeot in the closing stages: "In the last five hours I was in the pits with everybody, standing by the car when it came in. I didn't know where we were going in the rain. I know how difficult it is to drive a car like this on slicks in the rain."[114] Bourdais conceded Peugeot lost to a slightly stronger, quicker and more reliable Audi squad,[115] and his teammate Pagenaud preferred to have been the driver being caught, adding: "It was more difficult to finish second by only 13 seconds because it was such a tough battle."[111] Davidson denied employing gamesmanship on Lotterer, saying he had not received a team order and took his own initiative. He also said he did not deliberately collide with Lotterer and that the closed-cockpit Peugeot caused him to only observe the latter whilst braking.[116]

McNish was given advice to not travel so he could recover from body trauma.[117] He praised the strength of the Audi and said of the first hour accident that led to the No. 3 car's retirement: "Obviously, it was a very big accident. I think everybody realises that. I've been banged around a little bit, but the biggest thing is a little bit of pain in the bottom of my back and a big graze around my shin. Considering the impact, the speed and everything else, I think we all got away quite fortunate."[117] Beltoise said he did not observe McNish approaching his Ferrari from behind and was "very surprised" by the incident.[118] Rockenfeller praised car safety standards safety following his accident with Kauffman, saying: "The safety standards at Audi are simply incredible and have saved my life. I've never had such an accident before in my career and hope I'll never have such an experience again."[119] Wolfgang Ullrich, the Audi team principal, said closed-cockpit vehicle design did not provide a wider view as an open-cockpit car and denied that the team's two major race accidents were caused by visibility-related issues.[120]

Kimber-Smith stated Greaves being on a low-risk strategy race-long had proved fruitful, adding: "Theres a perception that you always have to be fast, but in LMP2 you also have to finish and that"s exactly what we did."[121] His teammate Lombard described the team's victory as "truly exceptional" having tested the car just once, saying: "It was a delight for me and even though there was fatigue and stress I thought I coped well. Hopefully this success can be the start of things, maybe even a driver for next year as well."[121] Milner described his LMGTE Pro victory as "was the hardest drive of my life" and said the changeable conditions would have made it easier.[122] Beretta said he became ill during a safety car period from breathing in exhaust gas and said of the challenge Corvette faced: "We had a lot of pressure and we just pushed as hard as we could. I think we really deserve the victory."[123] Doug Fehan, Corvette Racing's general manager, commented: “If I were to write a script to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Chevrolet and the 10th anniversary of Corvette Racing's first win at Le Mans, this would undoubtedly be it."[122]

The final result meant Peugeot remained in the LMP1 Manufacturers' Cup lead with 103 points ahead of Audi with 69 points. Corvette's class victory saw them progress to the top of the LMGTE Manufactuers' Cup with 84 points ahead of Ferrari and BMW with 72 points each. Audi Sport Team Joest overtook Peugeot Sport to lead the LMP1 Teams' Cup while Signatech and AF Corse retained the LMP2 and LMGTE Pro Teams' Cups respectively. Larbre moved past Proton Competition to lead the LMGTE Am Teams' Cup with four rounds remaining in the 2011 ILMC season.[7]

Race classification

Class winners are marked in bold. Cars failing to complete 70 per cent of winner's distance (249 laps) are marked as Not Classified (NC).[56][58][124]

Final race results
Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Tyre Laps Time/Retired
Engine
1 LMP1 2 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest Switzerland Marcel Fässler
Germany André Lotterer
France Benoît Tréluyer
Audi R18 TDI M 355 24:02'21:525
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Diesel)
2 LMP1 9 France Team Peugeot Total France Sébastien Bourdais
France Simon Pagenaud
Portugal Pedro Lamy
Peugeot 908 M 355 +13.854
Peugeot HDi 3.7 L Turbo V8
(Diesel)
3 LMP1 8 France Peugeot Sport Total France Stéphane Sarrazin
France Franck Montagny
France Nicolas Minassian
Peugeot 908 M 353 +2 Laps
Peugeot HDi 3.7 L Turbo V8
(Diesel)
4 LMP1 7 France Peugeot Sport Total United Kingdom Anthony Davidson
Austria Alexander Wurz
Spain Marc Gené
Peugeot 908 M 351 +4 Laps
Peugeot HDi 3.7 L Turbo V8
(Diesel)
5 LMP1 10 France Team Oreca-Matmut France Nicolas Lapierre
France Loïc Duval
France Olivier Panis
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP M 339 +16 Laps
Peugeot HDi 5.5 L Turbo V12
(Diesel)
6 LMP1 12 Switzerland Rebellion Racing France Nicolas Prost
Switzerland Neel Jani
Netherlands Jeroen Bleekemolen
Lola B10/60 M 338 +17 Laps
Toyota RV8KLM 3.4 L V8
7 LMP1 22 Belgium Kronos Racing
Belgium Marc VDS Racing Team
Belgium Vanina Ickx
Belgium Bas Leinders
Belgium Maxime Martin
Lola-Aston Martin B09/60 M 328 +27 Laps
Aston Martin 6.0 L V12
8 LMP2 41 United Kingdom Greaves Motorsport Saudi Arabia Karim Ojjeh
France Olivier Lombard
United Kingdom Tom Kimber-Smith
Zytek Z11SN D 326 +29 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
9 LMP2 26 France Signatech Nissan France Soheil Ayari
France Franck Mailleux
Spain Lucas Ordóñez
Oreca 03 D 320 +35 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
10 LMP2 33 United States Level 5 Motorsports United States Scott Tucker
France Christophe Bouchut
Portugal João Barbosa
Lola B08/80 M 319 +36 Laps
HPD HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
11 LMGTE
Pro
73 United States Corvette Racing Monaco Olivier Beretta
United States Tommy Milner
Spain Antonio García
Corvette C6.R M 314 +41 Laps
Corvette 5.5 L V8
12 LMP2 36 United Kingdom RML United Kingdom Mike Newton
United Kingdom Ben Collins
Brazil Thomas Erdos
HPD ARX-01d D 314 +41 Laps
HPD HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
13 LMGTE
Pro
51 Italy AF Corse SRL Italy Giancarlo Fisichella
Italy Gianmaria Bruni
Finland Toni Vilander
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 314 +41 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
14 LMP2 49 France OAK Racing Japan Shinji Nakano
Belgium Nicolas de Crem
Czech Republic Jan Charouz
OAK Pescarolo 01 D 313 +42 Laps
Judd-BMW HK 3.6 L V8
15 LMGTE
Pro
56 Germany BMW Motorsport United Kingdom Andy Priaulx
Germany Dirk Müller
United States Joey Hand
BMW M3 GT2 D 313 +42 Laps
BMW 4.0 L V8
16 LMGTE
Pro
77 Germany Team Felbermayr-Proton Germany Marc Lieb
Germany Wolf Henzler
Austria Richard Lietz
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 312 +43 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
17 LMGTE
Pro
76 France IMSA Performance Matmut France Raymond Narac
France Patrick Pilet
France Nicolas Armindo
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 311 +44 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
18 LMGTE
Pro
80 United States Flying Lizard Motorsports Germany Jörg Bergmeister
Germany Lucas Luhr
United States Patrick Long
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 310 +45 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
19 LMP2 40 Switzerland Race Performance Switzerland Michel Frey
Switzerland Ralph Meichtry
France Marc Rostan
Oreca 03 D 304 +51 Laps
Judd-BMW HK 3.6 L V8
20 LMGTE
Am
50 France Larbre Compétition France Patrick Bornhauser
France Julien Canal
Switzerland Gabriele Gardel
Corvette C6.R M 302 +53 Laps
Corvette 5.5 L V8
21 LMGTE
Am
70 France Larbre Compétition France Christophe Bourret
France Pascal Gibon
France Jean-Philippe Belloc
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 301 +54 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
22 LMGTE
Pro
65 Austria Lotus Jetalliance Switzerland Jonathan Hirschi
United Kingdom Johnny Mowlem
United Kingdom James Rossiter
Lotus Evora GTE M 295 +60 Laps
Toyota-Cosworth 4.0 L V6
23 LMGTE
Pro
75 Belgium Prospeed Competition Belgium Marc Goossens
Germany Marco Holzer
Netherlands Jaap van Lagen
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 293 +63 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
24 LMGTE
Pro
66 United Kingdom JMW Motorsport United Kingdom Rob Bell
United Kingdom Tim Sugden
Netherlands Xavier Maassen
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 D 290 +65 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
25 LMP2 35 France OAK Racing France Frédéric Da Rocha
France Patrice Lafargue
Italy Andrea Barlesi
OAK Pescarolo 01 D 288 +67 Laps
Judd-BMW HK 3.6 L V8
26 LMGTE
Am
68 United States Robertson Racing LLC United States David Robertson
United States Andrea Robertson
United States
Ford GT-R Mk. VII M 285 +70 Laps
Ford 5.0 L V8
27 LMGTE
Am
83 Monaco JMB Racing France Manuel Rodrigues
France Jean-Marc Menahem
France Nicolas Marroc
Ferrari F430 GTE D 272 +83 Laps
Ferrari 4.0 L V8
NC LMP2 44 France Extrême Limite AM Paris France Fabien Rosier
France Phillipe Haezebrouck
France Jean-René De Fournoux
Norma MP200P D 247 Not classified
Judd-BMW HK 3.6 L V8
DNF LMP1 16 France Pescarolo Team France Emmanuel Collard
France Christophe Tinseau
France Julien Jousse
Pescarolo 01 M 305 Accident
Judd GV5 S2 5.0 L V10
DNF LMGTE
Pro
55 Germany BMW Motorsport Brazil Augusto Farfus
Germany Jörg Müller
Germany Dirk Werner
BMW M3 GT2 D 276 Driveshaft
BMW 4.0 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
74 United States Corvette Racing United Kingdom Oliver Gavin
United Kingdom Richard Westbrook
Denmark Jan Magnussen
Corvette C6.R M 211 Accident
Corvette 5.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
81 United States Flying Lizard Motorsports United States Seth Neiman
United States Darren Law
United States Spencer Pumpelly
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 211 Accident
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP2 48 France Team Oreca-Matmut France Alexandre Prémat
France David Hallyday
Austria Dominik Kraihamer
Oreca 03 M 200 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
63 Germany Proton Competition Austria Horst Felbermayr Jr.
Austria Horst Felbermayr
Germany Christian Ried
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 199 Accident
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP1 13 Switzerland Rebellion Racing Italy Andrea Belicchi
France Jean-Christophe Boullion
United Kingdom Guy Smith
Lola B10/60 M 190 Accident
Toyota RV8KLM 3.4 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
61 Italy AF Corse SRL Italy Piergiuseppe Perazzini
Italy Marco Cioci
Republic of Ireland Seán Paul Breslin
Ferrari F430 GTE M 188 Accident
Ferrari 4.0 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
59 France Luxury Racing Monaco Stéphane Ortelli
France Frédéric Makowiecki
Brazil Jaime Melo
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 183 Engine
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
71 Italy AF Corse United States Robert Kauffman
United States Michael Waltrip
Portugal Rui Águas
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 178 Transmission
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
88 Germany Team Felbermayr-Proton United Kingdom Nick Tandy
Saudi Arabia Abdulaziz Al-Faisal
United States Bryce Miller
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 169 Accident
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP2 42 United Kingdom Strakka Racing United Kingdom Nick Leventis
United Kingdom Danny Watts
United Kingdom Jonny Kane
HPD ARX-01d M 144 Engine
HPD HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
DNF LMGTE
Am
60 United Arab Emirates Gulf AMR Middle East France Fabien Giroix
Germany Roald Goethe
United Kingdom Michael Wainright
Aston Martin Vantage GT2 D 141 Accident
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 39 Argentina Pecom Racing Argentina Luís Pérez Companc
Argentina Matías Russo
Germany Pierre Kaffer
Lola B11/40 M 139 Accident
Judd-BMW HK 3.6 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
89 Germany Hankook-Team Farnbacher Germany Dominik Farnbacher
Denmark Allan Simonsen
United States Leh Keen
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 H 137 Engine
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
58 France Luxury Racing France Anthony Beltoise
France François Jakubowski
France Pierre Thiriet
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 136 Accident
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
64 Austria Lotus Jetalliance Netherlands Oskar Slingerland
United Kingdom Martin Rich
United Kingdom John Hartshorne
Lotus Evora GTE M 126 Accident
Toyota-Cosworth 4.0 L V6
DNF LMGTE
Am
57 United States Krohn Racing United States Tracy Krohn
Sweden Niclas Jönsson
Italy Michele Rugolo
Ferrari F430 GTE D 123 Mechanical
Ferrari 4.0 L V8
DNF LMP1 24 France OAK Racing Monaco Richard Hein
France Jacques Nicolet
France Jean-François Yvon
OAK Pescarolo 01 D 119 Engine fire
Judd DB 3.4 L V8
DNF LMP1 1 Germany Audi Sport Team Joest Germany Timo Bernhard
France Romain Dumas
Germany Mike Rockenfeller
Audi R18 TDI M 116 Accident
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Diesel)
DNF LMP1 5 Switzerland Hope Racing Switzerland Steve Zacchia
Netherlands Jan Lammers
Denmark Casper Elgaard
Oreca 01 M 115 Fire
Swiss HyTech 2.0 L Hybrid Turbo I4
DNF LMGTE
Am
62 United Kingdom CRS Racing Germany Pierre Ehret
United Kingdom Shaun Lynn
New Zealand Roger Wills
Ferrari F430 GTE M 84 Accident
Ferrari 4.0 L V8
DNF LMP1 15 France OAK Racing France Guillaume Moreau
France Pierre Ragues
Portugal Tiago Monteiro
OAK Pescarolo 01 D 80 Power steering
Judd DB 3.4 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
79 United Kingdom Jota United Kingdom Sam Hancock
United Kingdom Simon Dolan
United Kingdom Chris Buncombe
Aston Martin Vantage GT2 D 74 Engine
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP1 20 Portugal Quifel-ASM Team Portugal Miguel Amaral
France Olivier Pla
United Kingdom Warren Hughes
Zytek 09SC D 48 Engine
Zytek ZG348 3.4 L V8
DNF LMP1 3 Germany Audi Sport North America Denmark Tom Kristensen
Italy Rinaldo Capello
United Kingdom Allan McNish
Audi R18 TDI M 14 Accident
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Diesel)
DNF LMP1 007 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Germany Stefan Mücke
United Kingdom Darren Turner
Austria Christian Klien
Aston Martin AMR-One M 4 Engine
Aston Martin 2.0 L Turbo I6
DNF LMP1 009 United Kingdom Aston Martin Racing Switzerland Harold Primat
Mexico Adrián Fernández
United Kingdom Andy Meyrick
Aston Martin AMR-One M 2 Engine
Aston Martin 2.0 L Turbo I6
Tyre manufacturers
Key
Symbol Tyre manufacturer
D Dunlop
M Michelin

Championship standings after the race

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External links


Intercontinental Le Mans Cup
Previous race:
1000 km of Spa
2011 season Next race:
6 Hours of Imola