Jacques Joseph Charles Villeneuve OQ (French: [ʒɑk vilnœv] born 9 April 1971) is a Canadian racing driver and amateur musician who won the 1997 Formula One World Championship with Williams. In addition to Formula One (F1) he has competed in various other forms of motor racing, winning the 1995 Indianapolis 500 and the 1995 PPG Indy Car World Series. He is the son of former Ferrari racing driver Gilles Villeneuve.

Villeneuve began kart racing at age 14 before progressing to open-wheel car racing in the Italian Formula Three Championship, which he raced in between 1989 and 1991. He moved to the higher-tier Toyota Atlantic Championship, participating in one race during the 1992 season and finishing third overall in the 1993 championship. He began competing in Championship Auto Racing Teams with the Forsythe/Green Racing team in the 1994 season, finishing sixth in the Drivers' Championship with one victory and earning Rookie of the Year and Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year honours. In the following year with the renamed Team Green, Villeneuve won four races (including the Indianapolis 500) and the Drivers' Championship.

Villeneuve moved to Williams in F1 for the 1996 season, claiming four Grand Prix victories, and becoming the first rookie runner-up in the World Drivers' Championship (WDC) after a season-long duel with teammate Damon Hill. His main title challenge for the following season came from Ferrari's Michael Schumacher, and Villeneuve beat the latter following a controversial collision at the season-ending European Grand Prix, becoming the first Canadian World Drivers' Champion, achieving seven Grand Prix victories. He finished fifth in the 1998 season achieving two podiums and helped Williams finish third in the World Constructors' Championship behind Ferrari and McLaren. After an unsuccessful 1999 with British American Racing (BAR), Villeneuve finished seventh in the WDC in both 2000 and 2001 with BAR, achieving two podiums in 2001, outscoring his teammates Ricardo Zonta and Olivier Panis. Then Villeneuve raced in F1 from 2002 to 2006, driving for BAR, Renault, Sauber and BMW Sauber, but he did not achieve any further success.

Villeneuve left Formula One mid-way through the 2006 season and began competing in various forms of motor racing such as sports car racing, NASCAR, and touring car racing. Though not as successful in these forms of racing, he won the 2008 1000 km of Spa driving for Peugeot. He is an outspoken figure who often says what is on his mind and has frequently commented on the state of Formula One. Villeneuve was appointed Officer of the National Order of Quebec in 1998. He was voted the winner of both the Lou Marsh Trophy and the Lionel Conacher Award in each of 1995 and 1997. Villeneuve is an inductee of the Canadian Motor Sports Hall of Fame, Canada's Sports Hall of Fame and the FIA Hall of Fame.

Early life

On 9 April 1971, Villeneuve was born in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu,[1][2] a small town outside of Montreal in the French-speaking Canadian province of Quebec.[3][4][5] He is the son of snowmobile and future Ferrari racer Gilles Villeneuve and his wife Joann Barthe.[6] Villeneuve has a sister, Melanie, and a half sister Jessica.[7] His uncle, Jacques Sr., whom he was named after also competed in motor racing.[7] Villeneuve spent most of his formative years travelling with the racing fraternity with his parents.[1]

Aged seven in 1978, he and his family relocated from Berthierville, Quebec,[5][8] to the small principality of Monaco on the French Riviera in France's south-east coast close to the border with Italy to be nearer to Ferrari's headquarters.[4][5] On the advice of driver Patrick Tambay,[9] Villeneuve was sent to the French-speaking Swiss private boarding Collège Alpin International Beau Soleil by his mother, which he attended from the ages of 12 (1983) to 17 (1988).[4][10] He excelled in BASE jumping, ice hockey, motocross and water skiing.[11] Villeneuve left the school by mutual consent between his mother and the school owners.[10]

Early racing career

Villeneuve's mother was aware from when he was five that he wanted to race,[12] and he went go-karting with his uncle several times in Canada.[13] In May 1982, his father died in an accident with Jochen Mass during qualifying for the 1982 Belgian Grand Prix at Circuit Zolder. Jacques became less interested in motor racing after that, fearing the sport's dangers.[6][14] In 1984, he asked his mother if he could do motor racing like his father. Villeneuve's mother agreed to let him race on the condition he improved his academic performance in one of his weakest subjects, mathematics.[15] Though his mother preferred him to do a course in aerodynamic or mechanical engineering,[13] she did not discourage her son from pursuing racing.[6] In early September 1985, Villeneuve was invited by a SAGIS employee to race in 100 cc go-kart at Italy's Imola Circuit. He impressed the track owners so much that they left him test a 135 cc kart and then a Formula Four car.[13][15] In July 1986, his uncle enrolled him in the Jim Russell Racing Driver School in Mont Tremblant,[a] where he passed a three-day course driving a Formula Ford 1600 car from Van Diemen.[b][13][17]

In mid-1987, he left his family to attend the Spenard-David Racing School in Shannonville, Ontario to hone his abilities under Richard Spenard.[18][6][17] Villeneuve did not have the money to pay for the course and his mother would not fund it because she thought Jacques finishing his education was more important. He, therefore, worked in a mechanics' training programme allowing students to learn racing in return for garage painting.[17][18] Aged 17, Villeneuve was invited to make his car racing debut in the Italian Touring Car Championship,[12] driving a Salerno Course-entered Group N Alfa Romeo 33 car for three rounds of the 1988 season. The Canadian and Italian authorities would not grant him a licence since he was a year younger than their minimum age requirement, so he obtained an international racing licence in Andorra with Canadian Automobile Sport Clubs aid.[c][18] Villeneuve performed poorly in each of the three rounds.[17]

The car Villeneuve drove in the 1989 Italian Formula Three Championship

He went on to sign a three-year contract to drive a Reynard-Alfa Romeo car for Prema in the Italian Formula Three Championship, a deal that was aided by the squad obtaining sponsorship from the Camel cigarette company.[d] Initially struggling to drive a Formula 3 car, he enrolled at the Magione Driving School. Under Henry Morrogh's direction, he gradually developed his character and driving technique. Villeneuve did not qualify five times, failed to finish three of the eleven races, and scored no points. In the 1990 season, he qualified for each of the 12 rounds and scored ten points for 14th in the Drivers' Championship.[e][18] Villeneuve was considered a title favourite for the 1991 championship. A late-season switch to the Ralt RT35 chassis failed to improve his performance, but he still finished sixth overall with 20 points and 3 podiums.[20][18] In late 1991, Villeneuve finished eighth in both the Macau Grand Prix and the Formula 3 Fuji Cup.[18]

The Toyota TS010 car Villeneuve shared with Eddie Irvine and Tom Kristensen at Mine Circuit.

Dissatisfied with his management in 1991,[21] he asked former Beausoleil sports administrator and motor racing promoter Craig Pollock to take over his management three times.[6][17][18] For the 1992 season, he wanted to compete in Formula 3000 in Europe with Prema, but he had not have the funding to do so. Villeneuve accepted an offer to relocate to Japan and drive a Toyota 032F car for the TOM'S squad in the Japanese Formula 3 Championship in 1992 following advice from Tambay. He felt the Japanese series was almost as good as the Italian one, and he did not want to remain in Europe. Villeneuve was the only driver to receive works support from TOM'S, and he got driver training. He won three races and finished no lower than sixth nine times, earning second in the Drivers' Championship and 45 points.[18] People in the racing world observed that ten years after his father's death, Villeneuve was becoming a well-known racer.[17][18] In August, Pollock negotiated an contract for Villeneuve to enter the Formula Atlantic street event at Trois-Rivières in the 1992 Atlantic Championship.[11][22] He finished third in the No. 49 Swift DB-4-Toyota car lent by the ComPred team.[18][23] In addition, he also tested a Class C Toyota that year and was mentored by driver Roland Ratzenberger.[9]

Four months later, Villeneuve accepted an invite to share a Class C TOM'S-entered Toyota TS010 car with Eddie Irvine and Tom Kristensen at the final round of the 1992 All Japan Sports Prototype Car Endurance Championship at Mine Circuit, finishing fourth. He was fourth at the Macau Grand Prix for TOM'S.[18] In Trois-Rivières, Villeneuve met crew chief Barry Green who wanted a driver for his new Forsythe-Green Racing squad.[11] He accepted a three-year contract from Green with personal sponsorship from sports marketing arm Player's November 1992.[8][21][17] He raced the lower-tier 1993 Atlantic Championship to become better acquainted with American open-wheel racing before progressing to Championship Auto Racing Teams (CART) in 1994.[18] Villeneuve built a close working relationship with aerodynamicist Tony Cicale.[24] Driving the No. 10 Ralt RT40-Toyota car, Villeneuve won five races and finished in the top three four times for third overall and 185 points after a season-long duel with David Empringham and teammate Claude Bourbonnais.[20][23][24] He was named the series' Rookie of the Year,[1] and ended 1993 retiring from the Macau Grand Prix driving a March Racing Ralt 93C-Fiat car.[24]

CART (1994–1995)

Villeneuve's 1995 Indianapolis 500 winning car

Villeneuve began participating in CART in the 1994 season for Forsythe-Green Racing, driving the No. 12 Reynard 94I-Ford XB vehicle after Green obtained sponsorship.[f][26][27] He debuted at the season-opening Australian FAI Indycar Grand Prix at Surfers Paradise Street Circuit, starting eighth and finishing 17th after colliding with Stefan Johansson. In the season's next round, the at Phoenix International Raceway, he was involved in a five-car accident which saw him sustain a side collision with Hiro Matsushita before being struck by Dominic Dobson. Qualifying fourth for his first Indianapolis 500 fourth, Villeneuve finished second, earning Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year honors as the highest-finishing rookie.[21][28] Villeneuve finished ninth or higher in six of the next nine rounds,[28] before beating Al Unser Jr. and Emerson Fittipaldi in the close finish to the at Road America road course in his first CART victory.[27] He placed seventh and third in the final two rounds ending the year with Rookie of the Year honors and was sixth in the Drivers' Championship with 94 points.[26][28]

Villeneuve racing in the 1995 PPG IndyCar World Series at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course

Before the 1995 season, he rejected offers from fellow CART teams and some Formula One (F1) squads and remained at the renamed Team Green driving the renumbered No. 27 Reynard 95I-Ford XB.[26][27] Before the season, Villeneuve and his team were concerned, as their car had been unreliable and under-performed in pre-season testing.[21][27] He won the season-opening after starting eighth, but he only finished two of the next four races. His season highlight was the Indianapolis 500. Though Villeneuve was penalised two laps for overtaking the pace car, he re-took the lead after fellow Canadian Scott Goodyear failed to serve a ten-second stop-and-go penalty for also passing the pace car. Winning just his second Indianapolis 500 start, Villeneuve took the Drivers' Championship lead. Villeneuve went on to win both the at Road America and the Grand Prix of Cleveland, also scoring points in all but one of the remaining rounds to clinch the title at the final race in Laguna Seca.[27][28] He won the championship with 172 points, four victories and six pole positions.[g][26]

Formula One career

Williams (1996–1998)

In early 1995, the Williams F1 team and engine supplier Renault became interested in Villeneuve replacing the outgoing David Coulthard. Bernie Ecclestone, F1's commercial rights holder, saw this as an opportunity to lure Villeneuve from CART although Team Green wanted him to remain in America.[29] Technical director Patrick Head and team principal Frank Williams gave Villeneuve a test in a FW17 car at Britain's Silverstone Circuit in August 1995. He lapped two seconds slower than driver Damon Hill.[h][30] Negotiations between Villenevue's representatives in mid-1995 led to Villeneuve signing a contract for 1996 and 1997 with the option for the 1998 season.[29][31] He was sent by Frank Williams to cover 6,000 mi (9,700 km) in testing during the six-month pre-season period testing on permanent European racing circuits,[28][32] and he also prepared by learning the circuits on a simulation computer game.[33]

1996

Villeneuve driving for Williams at the 1996 Canadian Grand Prix

He drove the docile FW18 car equipped with a powerful, reliable Renault engine and a better gearbox.[32][34] Villeneuve built up a rapport with his race engineer Jock Clear and learnt from his teammate Hill.[9][12] Although not considered a title favourite by the media,[35] he contended for the World Drivers' Championship with Hill but never led the standings. Villeneuve's debut at the season-opening Australian Grand Prix saw him become the second driver ever to claim pole position on his first start,[33] and despite an oil leak, he finished second.[34] He beat Ferrari's Michael Schumacher in the European Grand Prix three races later for his maiden F1 victory.[33] Villeneuve scored points in eight of the next eleven events and won the British Grand Prix, the Hungarian Grand Prix and the Portuguese Grand Prix.[28] Entering the season-ending Japanese Grand Prix, he had nine fewer points than Hill, requiring him to win the event and for Hill to score no points to claim the title.[28][36] However, Villeneuve's right-rear tyre came off his car, forcing him to retire from the race. He finish runner-up to Hill in the drivers' standings with 78 points in his maiden season.[28][31] Villeneuve was the first rookie to achieve four Grand Prix victories in his debut year and the first to finish runner-up overall.[i][37]

1997

Jacques Villeneuve racing the Williams FW19 car at the 1997 British Grand Prix.

Before the 1997 season, Hill moved to the Arrows team, resulting in Villeneuve's promotion to lead driver. He was paired with Heinz-Harald Frentzen.[38][39] He and Schumacher vied for that year's World Drivers' Championship and variously shared the title lead.[38] Villeneuve trained extensively and drove an aerodynamically efficient and powerful FW19 car designed around him.[12][40] He won seven Grands Prix and qualified on pole position eight times in the first 14 races. At the season's penultimate race, the Japanese Grand Prix, he had a chance to win the championship but was banned for overtaking under yellow flag conditions twice during practice. He was allowed to race under appeal but was disqualified from fifth when the appeal was rejected.[38][41] Before the season-ending European Grand Prix, Villeneuve had 77 points, one fewer than Schumacher, requiring him to finish in the top six and ahead of Schumacher to win the championship.[42] During qualifying, Villeneuve, Schumacher and Frentzen all set the exact same lap, but Villeneuve started from pole position per F1 regulations because he was the first driver to set the time. Villeneuve and Schumacher were involved in a collision that saw Schumacher careen into a gravel trap, giving the title to Villeneuve. He was the first driver to claim the F1 World Championship; the CART title and the Indianapolis 500. He was also Canada's first F1 World Champion.[41]

1998

Villeneuve threatened to leave F1 and return to CART if F1 introduced grooved tyres and narrower cars for the 1998 season.[5][39] Though these changes were adopted, he remained at Williams with Frentzen. Villeneuve's FW20 car had one-year old Mecachrome-branded engines after Renault's withdrawal from F1 after the 1997 season, which transported to be noncompetitive.[12][43] He scored points at nine Grands Prix with a season-high third at each of the German Grand Prix and at the following Hungarian Grand Prix. During practice for the Belgian Grand Prix, he lost control of his car in Eau Rouge corner and crashed backwards into the barrier at approximately 170 mph (270 km/h). Villeneuve was unhurt.[44] With 21 points, he finished fifth in the Drivers' Championship.[43]

British American Racing (1999–2003)

He left Williams following the 1998 season. McLaren technical director Adrian Newey, who liked Villeneuve's performance and who Villeneuve respected, offered him employment for the 1999 season, but Villeneuve rejected it.[45] He instead signed a contract to drive with the new British American Racing (BAR) team founded by Pollock and British American Tobacco following their late 1997 purchase of the financially struggling Tyrrell team. Villeneuve joined the team because he sought to emulate Schumacher's style of basing a team around him and employing highly skilled people to get from the bottom of the running order to the top.[46]

1999–2000

Villeneuve competing for British American Racing at the 2000 Belgian Grand Prix.

Villeneuve was joined at BAR by former McLaren test driver Ricardo Zonta for most of the season and then by Mika Salo for three Grands Prix. His BAR 01 car was efficient and fast but chronically unreliable.[47][48] He failed to finish each of the first eleven races due to either mechanical trouble or crashing.[49] Villeneuve was only able to finish four Grands Prix with a best finish of eighth at the Italian Grand Prix.[47] Villeneuve qualified a season-high fifth at the San Marino Grand Prix and was briefly third in the Spanish Grand Prix two events later before retiring.[48] During qualifying for the Belgian Grand Prix, he suffered a high-speed crash through Eau Rouge corner, which destroyed his car but left him uninjured. He tallied no points towards the Drivers' Championship.[49]

For the 2000 season, his BAR 002 car had a more reliable and powerful works Honda engine, and Zonta was again his teammate.[20][50][51] Villeneuve finished fourth at the season-opening Australian Grand Prix and scored two more points by placing fifth at the San Marino Grand Prix two races later. He also finished fourth at the French Grand Prix, the Austrian Grand Prix and the United States Grand Prix. Villeneuve scored points in the final two races by finishing sixth at the Japanese Grand Prix and fifth at the Malaysian Grand Prix.[51] Overall, his performances had improved from 1999 due to a better built and more reliable car,[51] and he finished seventh in the Drivers' Championship with 17 points.[50]

2001–2003

Villenueve driving his BAR 003 at the 2001 Spanish Grand Prix

There were rumours of Villeneuve leaving the BAR team after 2000.[52] He talked to Benetton, Ferrari and McLaren about racing with them in the 2001 championship.[53][54][55] Villeneuve later admitted McLaren was not an option since his management team got accused of conducting early season publicity and he disliked McLaren's corporate methodology.[56] Villeneuve also considered taking a sabbatical,[55] but he ultimately signed a three-year contract extension with BAR in July 2000.[57] He obtained a get-out clause enabling him to leave BAR should they under-perform.[58]

He was joined by Olivier Panis, and the 003 car he drove was approximately 30 kg (66 lb) lighter than the 002 chassis.[50] Villeneuve was cordial with his teammate since they could talk to each other in French, and set himself the goal of winning a race and finishing third in the Drivers' Championship. His car was fairly reliable but lacked rear grip and straight-line speed due to an underpowered Honda engine.[59] At the season-opening Australian Grand Prix, Villeneuve struck the rear of Ralf Schumacher's car, launching him into the air. One of Villeneuve's car's wheels struck marshal Graham Beveridge, killing him.[20] Villeneuve achieved BAR's first two podium results, finishing third at both the Spanish Grand Prix and the German Grand Prix. He finished the season seventh in the Drivers' Championship with 12 points.[60][59] Although he scored five fewer points than the year before, Villeneuve qualified higher than Panis eleven times in 2001.[59]

Villeneuve testing the BAR 004 car in 2002

Before the 2002 season Villeneuve remained at BAR.[61] He talked to team principal Flavio Briatore,[9] who offered him a seat at Renault in lieu of Jenson Button but Villeneuve rejected it.[12][50] Villeneuve ultimately opted to remain at BAR due to pressure from Honda, and he again partnered with Panis.[62] He became uncomfortable when new BAR team principal David Richards publicly mentioned that many spent on Villeneuve's high salary could be better used for research and development. The BAR 004 chassis proved to be more unreliable than the year before and slower due to an under-powered Honda engine. He scored four points for 12th in the Drivers' Championship with a fourth place at the British Grand Prix being his season's best result.[62] Villeneuve regretted remaining at BAR due to the lack of results,[63] and he was offered a contract to join Team Player's in CART for the 2003 championship before returning to BAR for the 2004 and 2005 F1 seasons. The deal was pushed by Richards but not agreed upon because Villeneuve's and Pollock's financial settlements were too great for team owner Gerald Forsythe to be willing to take on.[64]

He decided to remain at BAR for the 2003 season, and was partnered with Button. Villeneuve's BAR 005 car had a more powerful but bulky Honda engine.[50][65] He initially had a poor relationship with Button, not speaking to him and saying that Button "should be in a boy band".[66] Their relationship did not improve after the season-opening Australian Grand Prix when Villeneuve was due to make a pit stop but drove an additional lap when Button was due to make his, leaving Button stationary behind Villeneuve. Though he blamed it on "radio problems". Button and Richards hinted their disbelief in his execution.[65] Villeneuve was outperformed by his teammate and retired eight times due to mechanical faults. He finished sixth at both the Brazilian Grand Prix and the Italian Grand Prix. Before the season-ending Japanese Grand Prix, Villeneuve was informed by Richards he was no longer needed. He was replaced by test driver Takuma Sato.[50][65] He was 16th in the Drivers' Championship with 6 points.[65]

Renault and Sauber (2004–2006)

Villeneuve qualifying for Sauber at the 2005 United States Grand Prix.

Villeneuve took a sabbatical after BAR released him.[67] He thought of taking up NASCAR as a new challenge, but no teams approached him.[68] After speaking to senior officials from BAR and Williams, Villeneuve believed that they would want to resign him to their respective teams, but neither move occurred.[67][69] When he realised no competitive team would employ him,[69] He and Pollock met Sauber team owner Peter Sauber in Hinwil in mid-2004.[67] Impressed with Sauber's professionalism,[69] he signed a two-year contract the next month to drive for Sauber from the 2005 season and help them attract new sponsors and partners.[67]

Villeneuve racing at the 2006 Canadian Grand Prix for the BMW Sauber

Before his tenure at Sauber began, Villeneuve was employed by Briatore to help Renault claim second from BAR in the World Constructors' Championship by scoring the maximum number of points in the 2004 season's final three races following the dismissal of Jarno Trulli for performing poorly.[67][69] Sauber was comfortable in letting Villeneuve drive for Renault because both teams used Michelin tyres.[9] Driving the R24 car, he finished all three events but under-performed and was lapped each time. Villeneuve scored no points and was unclassified in the Drivers' Championship.[67][69]

At Sauber, he used a C24 chassis and was teammates with Felipe Massa. A lack of both pre-season testing and money for car development caused Villeneuve to have a difficult handling car.[70] He did not have a good relationship with the team because he was not allowed to give feedback on car setup due to Willy Rampf's influence.[9][12] Villeneuve finished a season-high fourth at the San Marino Grand Prix and scored more points in eighth at the French Grand Prix and sixth at the Belgian Grand Prix.[j][70] He was 14th in the Drivers' Championship with 9 points.[38][70]

For the 2006 championship, he stayed at the renamed BMW Sauber after BMW purchased the team. Nick Heidfeld was his teammate. The atmosphere within the team made Villeneuve content, and he was happy with BMW's involvement. He found the less electronically dependent and less refined aerodynamically F1.06 car more driveable. Team principal Mario Theissen criticised Villeneuve for not achieving decent results, thus failing to please BMW's board of directors.[72] Despite retiring three times, he accumulated 7 points from the first 11 races, ranking him 15th in the Drivers' Championship.[20][72] At the German Grand Prix, Villeneuve sustained muscle pains in an accident exiting a corner. Shortly afterward, Theissen terminated his contract and replaced him with Robert Kubica.[72] He did not want to be part of a shootout between himself and Kubica,[73] and saw his release as a precursor to his future, saying "Screw this, It's time to get on with the rest of my life."[3] Villeneuve twice failed to return to F1, first with Stefan Grand Prix in the 2010 season, then with his team in partnership with Durango for the following year.[20]

Post Formula One career

2007–2010

Villeneuve driving the No. 7 Peugeot 908 HDi FAP at the 2007 24 Hours of Le Mans

He explored NASCAR after exiting F1, talking to Roush Racing owner Jack Roush who agreed to help Villeneuve obtain Truck Series experience before progressing to the Busch Series in 2007 on the condition of a sponsorship agreement.[74] Before that, he made his 24 Hours of Le Mans debut with Peugeot in the 2007 edition informing team manager Serge Saulnier that he wanted to complete the Triple Crown of Motorsport.[k][75] Sharing the Le Mans Prototype 1 (LMP1)-class No. 7 Peugeot 908 HDi FAP car with Marc Gené and Nicolas Minassian, Villeneuve retired after 338 laps with engine injection trouble.[76][77] He entered into a partnership with Bill Davis Racing (BDR) to enter the 2007 NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series' last seven events in its No. 27 Toyota Tundra in anticipation of racing full-time in 2008.[78][79] Villeneuve finished outside the top ten in all seven events for 42nd overall with 615 points.[80] That same year, he drove two races in the Nextel Cup Series (the UAW-Ford 500 at Talladega Superspeedway and the Checker Auto Parts 500 at Phoenix) in BDR's No. 27 Toyota,[l] finishing 21st and 41st respectively.[82]

Villeneuve attempting to qualify for the 2008 Daytona 500

He and Pollock agreed to end their working relationship in early 2008, and Barry Green began managing him. That February, BDR released Villeneuve, who failed to qualify for the Daytona 500 of the renamed Sprint Cup Series after causing a multi-car accident in the Gatorade Duels.[83] Two months later, he raced the final two rounds of the inaugural season of the Middle East and Southeast Asian-based stock car Speedcar Series at the Bahrain International Circuit and the Dubai Autodrome.[84][85] Villeneuve then won the 2008 1000 km of Spa (part of the Le Mans Series) for Peugeot with Gené and Minassian in his first race victory for 11 years.[20] Although he finished second in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, sharing Peugeot's No. 7 LMP1 entry with Gené and Minassian,[77] he was released a month later because Peugeot wanted a French driver.[12] In August, Villeneuve signed a contract to make his Nationwide Series debut driving Braun Racing's No. 32 Toyota Camry in the NAPA Auto Parts 200 at Montreal's Circuit Gilles Villeneuve,[86] finishing 16th.[87] He also came 16th at the Autódromo Oscar y Juan Gálvez round of Top Race V6 Argentina aboard Oro Racing Team's No. 27 Volkswagen Passat TRV6.[88]

Villeneuve returned to the Speedcar Series in the 2008–09 season driving for Durango.[89] Competing in five races, he finished in the top ten three times, scoring seven points for 11th in the Drivers' Championship.[90] In mid-2009, Villeneuve partook in the Tide 250 at Autodrome Saint-Eustache and the GP3R 100 at Circuit Trois-Rivières of the NASCAR Canadian Tire Series for the Jacombs Racing Team in its No. 7 Ford Fusion,[91] finishing fourth at Trois-Rivieres.[92] For the first and only time, Villeneuve entered the Spa 24 Hours in 2009. He shared Gravity Racing International's G2 category No. 118 Mosler MT900R GT3 with Vincent Radermecker, Loris de Sordi and Ho-Pin Tung. The trio failed to finish.[77] He drove the No. 27 Mercedes TRV6 at the Interlagos Circuit and Autódromo Oscar y Juan Gálvez rounds of Top Race V6 Argentina,[93] achieving a best finish of 13th in Buenos Aires.[90] He made one appearance in the 2009 Nationwide Series, finishing fourth at the NAPA Auto Parts 200 in Braun Racing's No. 32 car.[94][95]

In 2010, Villeneuve ran the Nationwide Series road courses at Road America, Watkins Glen and Montreal in Braun Racing's No. 32 vehicle.[96][97] He finished eighth at Watkins Glen before claiming third at Montreal, where he started second.[98] In mid-season, Villeneuve entered the Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway finishing 29th in Braun Racing's No. 32 car.[99][100] Villeneuve joined Rod Nash Racing as Paul Dumbrell's international co-driver in its No. 55 Ford FG Falcon for the Gold Coast 600 double header in October 2010 and sought advice from driver Marcos Ambrose on touring car racing.[m][102] He finished 22nd in the first race and fifth in the second.[103] Ford motorsport manager Chris Styring considered Villeneuve for the Bathurst 1000, the L&H 500 and the Gold Coast 600 in the 2011 International V8 Supercars Championship, but Villeneuve's financial demands were too great for Ford.[104]

2011–present

Villeneuve racing the No. 22 Dodge at the 2011 Bucyrus 200

He drove the Road America and Montreal road course races of the 2011 NASCAR Nationwide Series for Penske Racing in its No. 22 Dodge Challenger in lieu of Brad Keselowski.[105] Villeneuve finished the Road America race third and qualified on pole position for the Montreal event but finished 27th despite leading 29 laps.[106] In August 2011, he joined Shell V-Power Racing for the Stock Car Corrida do Milhão for the 2011 championship of Stock Car Brasil despite concerns about adapting to his car.[107] Driving the No. 27 Peugeot 408,[90] Villeneuve qualified 27th and finished 18th.[108] He was employed by Penske to drive its No. 22 car at the Road America and Montreal road course races in the 2012 NASCAR Nationwide Series.[109] Villeneuve finished sixth at Road America and third at Montreal.[110] During the 2012 International V8 Supercars Championship, he filled in for the injured Greg Murphy for three rounds in Kelly Racing's No. 51 Holden Commodore,[111] finishing no higher than 24th.[112] He finished seventh sharing Vita4One's No. 34 BMW Z4 GT3 with Jos Verstappen at the City Challenge Baku GT event in October.[77][113]

Villeneuve competing at the 2012 Coates Hire Ipswich 300

When Villeneuve expressed interest in the International V8 Supercars Championship, he was considered for a full-time seat at Kelly Racing in the 2013, but no agreement was reached.[114] For the first and only time, he partook in the Le Mans double header counting towards the of the FFSA GT Championship, sharing the No. 27 Sport Garage-entered Ferrari 458 Italia GT3 with Éric Cayrolle.[77][n] The duo finished 11th in the first race and retired from the next.[o][77] Midway through the season, Villeneuve was hired by car owner James Finch to drive the Toyota/Save Mart 350 at Sonoma Raceway in the Sprint Cup Series for Phoenix Racing in its No. 51 Chevrolet SS, finishing 41st due to mechanical trouble after 19 laps.[116][117] Later that year, he finished fifth in the Grand Prix de Trois Rivieres (part of the Canadian Tire Series) in 22 Racing's Dodge Challenger.[118][119]

Villeneuve driving a Peugeot 208 Supercar at the 2014 World RX of Great Britain

In 2014, he signed to drive an Albatec Racing-prepared Peugeot 208 Supercar part-time in the FIA World Rallycross Championship's inaugural season.[120][121] Villeneuve chose to do rallycross because he felt it was exciting for both drivers and spectators.[121] In seven races, Villeneuve scored eight points for 37th in the Drivers' Championship.[122] He was released before the season ended due to non-supportive statements he made concerning his team and rallycross.[123] Villeneuve entered the Indianapolis 500 for the first time in 19 years, driving Schmidt Peterson Hamilton Motorsports' No. 5 Dallara DW12-Honda third car entry.[p][26][125] Though he had not planned to return to American open-wheel racing, he changed his mind after the 2012 introduction of a new car and engine formula.[126] He qualified 27th and finished 14th.[26] In August, Villeneuve finished 24th in Jacombs' No. 7 Dodge at Canadian Tire Series' Grand Prix de Trois Rivieres.[127][128]

Villeneuve during qualifying at the 2015 Punta del Este ePrix

He accepted an invitation to enter 2015 Stock Car Brasil's season-opening Autódromo Internacional Ayrton Senna round alongside Zonta in Shell Racing's No. 10 Chevrolet Sonic, placing 21st.[90][129] Villeneuve signed a contract to replace Heidfeld and partner with Stéphane Sarrazin at Venturi Grand Prix in the 2015–16 season of the all-electric Formula E series.[130] Villeneuve had observed Formula E intently throughout 2014, admiring its bumpy city tracks. Guido Pastor called him to test a car, after which he got selected to drive.[131][132] Villeneuve finished outside the top ten in the first two races and failed to start the Punta del Este ePrix due to an accident during qualifying.[133] His relationship with Venturi cooled thereafter and they agreed to terminate their working relationship early in January 2016.[134] Villeneuve signed a one-race agreement to return to rallycross in the 2018 season.[135] He drove a Subaru Rally Team USA-entered WRX STi Supercar at the World RX of Canada (part of the Americas Rallycross Championship).[136] He failed to qualify for the final following two accidents sustained during the second semi-final.[137]

For the 2019 season, Villeneuve shared Scuderia Baldini 27's GT3 Pro-class No. 27 Ferrari 488 GT3 Evo with Giancarlo Fisichella and Stefano Gai in the Italian GT Championship, finishing fourth at the 3 Hours of Misano and second at the 3 Hours of Vallelunga.[77][90] He raced as a guest driver at the Ring Knutstorp and Karlskoga Motorstadion rounds of the Porsche Carrera Cup Scandinavia in a MTech Competition-entered Porsche 911 GT3 Cup car, placing in the top ten in the second race of both rounds.[138] That year, he made his debut in NASCAR Whelen Euro Series in the Elite 1 Division. Villeneuve drove the No. 32 Go Fas Racing Chevrolet, finishing the season eighth in points with 431 scored, two pole positions and seven top-tens.[139] For the 2020 season, he entered that year's Whelen Euro Series with FEED Vict Racing, a team owned by him and Patrick Lemarié.[140] Driving four rounds in the No. 5 car, he achieved two top fives for 104 points (21st overall) in the Elite 1 Division.[20][141] He drove Academy Motorsport's No. 5 car in the 2021 Whelen Euro Series,[142] achieving his first two series victories in both races of the season's final round at Vallelunga,[143] and scoring 331 points for ninth in the points standings with two wins and four top-ten finishes.[144]

Non-racing ventures and personal life

Villeneuve began writing music after purchasing a guitar in 1996.[145] When he became uncertain whether he would remain at Sauber for the 2006 F1 season in November 2005,[146] he elected to rent a professional recording studio in Paris to in order to better hear his music. Travelled to England to record with the Tenebrae Choir,[145] Villeneuve recorded nearly every day for a month before stopping to prioritise motor racing.[146] That same year, he released his debut French single, Accepterais-tu,[145] and an acoustic rock album Private Paradise with 13 songs (nine in French and four in English) in 2007.[145][147] Six songs each were written by Villeneuve and his friends; he also performed a cover of Women Come, Women Go by Gazebo.[147] Villeneuve collaborated with vocalists Steve Smith and Amélie Veille.[148] The album debuted at No. 49 on the Quebec pop charts and received negative media reviews.[149] It sold 233 copies in Quebec and 836 in North America.[150][151]

Villeneuve carrying the Olympic flag into BC Place during the 2010 Winter Olympics opening ceremony.

He was a guest on the 6 June 1995 and 2 June 1998 episodes of the Late Show with David Letterman.[152] Villeneuve made a cameo appearance as a racing driver in the 2001 film Driven.[153] He carried the Olympic torch in Old Montreal during the 2010 Winter Olympics torch relay in December 2009.[154] Villeneuve also carried the Olympic flag at the opening ceremony.[155] Villeneuve was employed by Disney France in late 2010, spending two days recording the French-language voice of a racing announcer for the 2011 Pixar animated film Cars 2.[156] He analysed the 2012 Canadian Grand Prix for the British television channel Sky Sports F1.[157] Since 2013, Villeneuve has commentated for the pay-TV services Sky Sport in Italy and Canal+ in France.[158] He co-designed the Area 27 racing track in Okanagan, British Columbia.[159]

He was engaged firstly to the Montreal college student Sandrine Gros D"Aillon, then to Australian pop singer Dannii Minogue and later American ballerina Ellen Green.[72] However, Villenevue's first marriage was to Parisian Johanna Martinez in May 2006. They had two children before divorcing in June 2009.[160] In June 2012, he married Brazilian model Camila Lopez, with whom he has two children.[161] Since January 2017, Revenu Québec has pursued Villeneuve for $1.7 million in unpaid taxes after doing an audit of his business activities from 2010 to 2012.[162] The October 2021 release of the Pandora Papers revealed that he had setup offshore companies in the tax-free jurisdictions of the Bahamas and the British Virgin Islands in the 1990s and early 2000s to receive endorsement and income and to avoid paying Canadian income tax.[163]

Public image and personality

Journalist Gerald Donaldson describes Villeneuve as "engagingly eccentric, opinionated and outspoken" and one who "defied convention and challenged authority, saying exactly what he thought in an era when drivers were expected to express only sweet-talking platitudes."[3] He was popular with the European press for his reliance to speak his mind in a time of political correctness.[164] He publicly bemoaned F1's commercialised and commodified image,[165] the sport's structure, focus on cheaper, younger, corporate groomed drivers,[166] and the manufacturing of driver personalities by corporations so as not to impugn their reputation by drivers saying what they felt.[167] Villeneuve frequently dyed his hair in various colours and sported grunge street wear.[3][168] His behaviour earned him multiple cautions from F1's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile, for bring the series into disrepute. However, Max Mosley, the association's president, commented that Vlleneuve's controversies would benefit him when he was no longer successful.[3]

Villeneuve's star on Canada's Walk of Fame

Villeneuve's decision to be independent as much as possible from media relations to avoid over promotion was endorsed by Pollock.[28] He refused to conduct substantial public relations duties for teams even after BAT attempted to purchase more public relations appearances for him, and he limited his commitments communicating to the press.[169] Journalist Matt Bishop observed that Villeneuve was frequently criticised for refusing to do sponsorship functions and for his self-imposed limiting interactions with the press at Grands Prix, but Bishop noted others appreciated Villeneuve's focus on racing and instead of "extraneous commitments".[170] Villeneuve resisted to join the Grand Prix Drivers' Association (GPDA), which he believed would serve only the interests of drivers and not F1's. However, he finally joined in late 2000, feeling his views were being ignored.[171] Villeneuve decided to resign from the GPDA in mid-2006 because he was unhappy that its president, Schumacher, had been deemed to have purposely stopped during qualifying for the 2006 Monaco Grand Prix.[172]

He was voted the winner of the Lorenzo Bandini Trophy in 1996, and both the Lou Marsh Trophy and the Lionel Conacher Award in 1995 and 1997.[173] Villeneuve received the Hawthorn Memorial Trophy for 1997 as the most successful British or Commonwealth driver over the course of a season.[174] In April 1998, he was appointed Officer of the National Order of Quebec but collected the honour at the following year's ceremony due to his racing commitments.[175] He was added to Canada's Walk of Fame two months later.[176] In December 2010, Villeneuve was inducted into the athlete category of Canada's Sports Hall of Fame.[177] He was added to both the FIA Hall of Fame and the Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame seven and eight years later respectively.[178][179]

Driving ability and racing helmet

Villeneuve's racing helmet on display at the Williams Conference Centre in 2017

Journalist Mark Hughes describes Villeneuve's driving as "spectacular" and "hard-charging". Villeneuve frequently went past the edge of the available track to increase his momentum as much as possible.[180] He provided his engineers with suggestions that Maurice Hamilton wrote were "so far from the norm to the point of diametrically opposed to standard practice, sometimes giving the impression of being pursued just for the hell of it."[181] Villeneuve prefers driving on slick tyres and with no electronic driver aids. He found driver aids difficult and thus ran with less traction control than his teammates since he could not deal with either the anti-lock system on the rear brakes or heavy traction control.[182] This required Villeneuve to modify his driving style and take fewer risks until his exit from F1 in 2006.[180] He switched from wearing spectacles in his helmet to contact lenses in 1994 after his spectacles vibrated slightly on minor bumps in Indianapolis.[183]

Villeneuve based the design of his racing helmet on his father's, reportedly drawing it on a doodling pad.[184] He looked at a photograph of his mother wearing a pink, yellow, green and blue V-shaped striped polo shirt at a motor race her husband was competing at, and he used her pencils to produce the design.[183][184] Villeneuve incorporated an inverted V-style swoosh with varying thickness of colours around the shape on the helmet's two sides.[184] He retained a single black line from his first design in the centre to divide the colours without difficulty.[q][183]

Racing results

Career summary

Season Series Team Races Poles Wins Points Position
1989 Italian Formula Three Championship Prema Racing 6 0 0 0
1990 Italian Formula Three Championship Prema Racing 12 0 0 10 13th
1991 Italian Formula Three Championship Prema Racing 11 3 0 20 6th
1992 All-Japan Formula Three Championship TOM'S 11 2 3 45 2nd
All Japan Sports Prototype Championship Toyota Team TOM'S 1 0 0 N/A NC
Toyota Atlantic Championship Comprep/Player's 1 0 0 14 28th
1993 Toyota Atlantic Championship Forsythe/Green Racing 15 7 5 185 3rd
Macau Grand Prix 1 0 0 N/A NC
1994 PPG Indy Car World Series Forsythe/Green Racing 15 0 1 94 6th
1995 PPG Indy Car World Series Team Green 17 6 4 172 1st
1996 Formula One Rothmans Williams Renault 16 3 4 78 2nd
1997 Formula One Rothmans Williams Renault 17 10 7 81 1st
1998 Formula One Winfield Williams 16 0 0 21 5th
1999 Formula One British American Racing 16 0 0 0 21st
2000 Formula One Lucky Strike BAR Honda 17 0 0 17 7th
2001 Formula One Lucky Strike BAR Honda 17 0 0 12 7th
2002 Formula One Lucky Strike BAR Honda 17 0 0 4 12th
2003 Formula One Lucky Strike BAR Honda 14 0 0 6 16th
2004 Formula One Mild Seven Renault F1 Team 3 0 0 0 21st
2005 Formula One Sauber Petronas 18 0 0 9 14th
2006 Formula One BMW Sauber F1 Team 12 0 0 7 15th
2007 NASCAR Nextel Cup Bill Davis Racing Toyota 2 0 0 140 60th
NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series 7 0 0 615 59th
24 Hours of Le Mans Team Peugeot Total 1 0 0 N/A NC
2008 NASCAR Nationwide Series Braun Racing Toyota 1 0 0 120 111th
Speedcar Series Speedcar Team 4 0 0 3 13th
Le Mans Series Team Peugeot Total 1 0 1 10 9th
24 Hours of Le Mans 1 0 0 N/A 2nd
Top Race V6 Oro Racing Team 1 0 0 0 NC
2008–09 Speedcar Series Durango 5 0 0 7 11th
2009 NASCAR Nationwide Series Braun Racing Toyota 1 0 0 165 107th
NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Jacombs Racing Ford 2 0 0 257 33rd
Top Race V6 2 0 0 0 NC
FIA GT Championship Gravity Racing International 1 0 0 0 NC
2010 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Braun Racing Toyota 1 0 0 76 69th
NASCAR Nationwide Series 3 0 0 405 77th
V8 Supercar Championship Series Rod Nash Racing 2 0 0 N/A NC
2011 NASCAR Nationwide Series Penske Racing 2 1 0 61 52nd
Stock Car Brasil Shell V-Power Racing 1 0 0 N/A NC
2012 NASCAR Nationwide Series Penske Racing 2 0 0 82 49th
International V8 Supercars Championship Kelly Racing 6 0 0 N/A NC
2013 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Phoenix Racing 1 0 0 3 51st
NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Dave Jacombs 1 0 0 43 43rd
2014 IndyCar Series Schmidt Peterson Motorsports 1 0 0 29 30th
World Rallycross Championship Albatec Racing 8 0 0 8 38th
NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Dave Jacombs 1 0 0 20 54th
2015 Stock Car Brasil Shell Racing 1 0 0 0 NC
2015–16 Formula E Venturi Grand Prix 3 0 0 0 20th
2018 Americas Rallycross Championship Subaru Rally Team USA 1 0 0 12 14th
2019 NASCAR Whelen Euro Series Go Fas Racing 13 2 0 431 8th
2020 NASCAR Whelen Euro Series FEED Vict Racing 4 0 0 104 21st
2021 NASCAR Whelen Euro Series Academy Motorsport 8 1 1 331 9th
Sources:[20][90]

American open-wheel racing results

Toyota Atlantic Championship

Toyota Atlantic results
Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Rank Points
1992 Comprep/Player's MIA PHX LBH LIM MON WGL TOR TRR
3
VAN MDO MOS NAZ LS1 LS2 14th 28
1993 Forsythe/Green Racing PHX
18
LBH
2
ATL
1
MIL
17
MON
1
MOS
2
HAL
7
TOR
3
LOU
2
TRR
14
VAN
19
MDO
1
NAZ
11
LS1
1
LS2
1
3rd 185
Source:[23]

CART

Champ Car results
Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Rank Points
1994 Forsythe/Green Racing SRF
17
PHX
25
LBH
15
INDY
2
MIL
9
DET
7
POR
6
CLE
4
TOR
9
MCH
20
MDO
9
NHA
24
VAN
24
ROA
1
NAZ
7
LAG
3
6th 94
1995 Team Green MIA
1
SRF
20
PHX
5
LBH
25
NAZ
2
INDY
1
MIL
6
DET
9
POR
20
ROA
1
TOR
3
CLE
1
MCH
10
MDO
3
NHA
4
VAN
12
LAG
11
1st 172
Source:[26]

IndyCar Series

IndyCar Series results
Year Team Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Rank Points
2014 Schmidt Peterson Hamilton Motorsports Dallara DW12 Honda STP LBH ALA IMS INDY
14
DET DET TXS HOU HOU POC IOW TOR TOR MDO MIL SNM FON 30th 29
Source:[26]

Indianapolis 500

Year Chassis Engine Start Finish Team
1994 Reynard 94I Ford XB 4 2 Forsythe/Green Racing
1995 Reynard 95I Ford XB 5 1 Team Green
2014 Dallara Honda 27 14 Schmidt Peterson Motorsports
Source:[26]

Formula One

Formula One results
Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 WDC Points
1996 Rothmans Williams Renault Williams FW18 Renault RS8 3.0 V10 AUS
2
BRA
Ret
ARG
2
EUR
1
SMR
11
MON
Ret
ESP
3
CAN
2
FRA
2
GBR
1
GER
3
HUN
1
BEL
2
ITA
7
POR
1
JPN
Ret
2nd 78
1997 Rothmans Williams Renault Williams FW19 Renault RS9 3.0 V10 AUS
Ret
BRA
1
ARG
1
SMR
Ret
MON
Ret
ESP
1
CAN
Ret
FRA
4
GBR
1
GER
Ret
HUN
1
BEL
5
ITA
5
AUT
1
LUX
1
JPN
DSQ
EUR
3
1st 81
1998 Winfield Williams Williams FW20 Mecachrome GC37-01 V10 AUS
5
BRA
7
ARG
Ret
SMR
4
ESP
6
MON
5
CAN
10
FRA
4
GBR
7
AUT
6
GER
3
HUN
3
BEL
Ret
ITA
Ret
LUX
8
JPN
6
5th 21
1999 British American Racing BAR 01 Supertec FB01 3.0 V10 AUS
Ret
BRA
Ret
SMR
Ret
MON
Ret
ESP
Ret
CAN
Ret
FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
AUT
Ret
GER
Ret
HUN
Ret
BEL
15
ITA
8
EUR
10
MAL
Ret
JPN
9
NC 0
2000 Lucky Strike Reynard BAR Honda BAR 002 Honda RA000E 3.0 V10 AUS
4
BRA
Ret
SMR
5
GBR
16
ESP
Ret
EUR
Ret
MON
7
CAN
15
FRA
4
AUT
4
GER
8
HUN
12
BEL
7
ITA
Ret
USA
4
JPN
6
MAL
5
7th 17
2001 Lucky Strike BAR Honda BAR 003 Honda RA001E 3.0 V10 AUS
Ret
MAL
Ret
BRA
7
SMR
Ret
ESP
3
AUT
8
MON
4
CAN
Ret
EUR
9
FRA
Ret
GBR
8
GER
3
HUN
9
BEL
8
ITA
6
USA
Ret
JPN
10
7th 12
2002 Lucky Strike BAR Honda BAR 004 Honda RA002E 3.0 V10 AUS
Ret
MAL
8
BRA
10
SMR
7
ESP
7
AUT
10
MON
Ret
CAN
Ret
EUR
12
GBR
4
FRA
Ret
GER
Ret
HUN
Ret
BEL
8
ITA
9
USA
6
JPN
Ret
12th 4
2003 Lucky Strike BAR Honda BAR 005 Honda RA003E 3.0 V10 AUS
9
MAL
DNS
BRA
6
SMR
Ret
ESP
Ret
AUT
12
MON
Ret
CAN
Ret
EUR
Ret
FRA
9
GBR
10
GER
9
HUN
Ret
ITA
6
USA
Ret
JPN 16th 6
2004 Mild Seven Renault F1 Team Renault R24 Renault RS24 3.0 V10 AUS MAL BHR SMR ESP MON EUR CAN USA FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA CHN
11
JPN
10
BRA
10
21st 0
2005 Sauber Petronas Sauber C24 Petronas 05A 3.0 V10 AUS
13
MAL
Ret
BHR
11
SMR
4
ESP
Ret
MON
11
EUR
13
CAN
9
USA
DNS
FRA
8
GBR
14
GER
15
HUN
Ret
TUR
11
ITA
11
BEL
6
BRA
12
JPN
12
CHN
10
14th 9
2006 BMW Sauber F1 Team BMW Sauber F1.06 BMW P86 2.4 V8 BHR
Ret
MAL
7
AUS
6
SMR
12
EUR
8
ESP
12
MON
14
GBR
8
CAN
Ret
USA
Ret
FRA
11
GER
Ret
HUN TUR ITA CHN JPN BRA 15th 7
Sources:[20][185]

Did not finish, but was classified as he had completed more than 90% of the race distance.

Sports car career

24 Hours of Le Mans

24 Hours of Le Mans results
Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
2007 Team Peugeot Total Nicolas Minassian
Marc Gené
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP LMP1 338 DNF DNF
2008 Team Peugeot Total Nicolas Minassian
Marc Gené
Peugeot 908 HDi FAP LMP1 381 2nd 2nd
Source:[77]

Le Mans Series

Le Mans Series results
Year Entrant Class Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 Rank Points
2008 Team Peugeot Total LMP1 Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Peugeot HDI 5.5 L Turbo V12
(Diesel)
CAT MON SPA
1
NÜR SIL 9th 10
Source:[77]

Complete 24 Hours of Spa results

24 Hours of Spa results
Year Class Tyres Car Team Co-Drivers Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
2009 G2 M Mosler MT900 R GT3
Chevrolet LS7 7.0 L V8
Gravity Racing International Vincent Radermecker

Ho-Pin Tung
65 DNF
Source:[77]

NASCAR

(key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)

Sprint Cup Series

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 NSCC Pts Ref
2007 Bill Davis Racing 27 Toyota DAY CAL LVS ATL BRI MAR TEX PHO TAL RCH DAR CLT DOV POC MCH SON NHA DAY CHI IND POC GLN MCH BRI CAL RCH NHA DOV KAN TAL
21
CLT MAR ATL TEX PHO
41
HOM 60th 140 [82]
2008 DAY
DNQ
CAL LVS ATL BRI MAR TEX PHO TAL RCH DAR CLT DOV POC MCH SON NHA DAY CHI IND POC GLN MCH BRI CAL RCH NHA DOV KAN TAL CLT MAR ATL TEX PHO HOM NA 0 [186]
2010 Braun Racing 32 Toyota DAY CAL LVS ATL BRI MAR PHO TEX TAL RCH DAR DOV CLT POC MCH SON NHA DAY CHI IND
29
POC GLN MCH BRI ATL RCH NHA DOV KAN CAL CLT MAR TAL TEX PHO HOM 69th 76 [100]
2013 Phoenix Racing 51 Chevy DAY PHO LVS BRI CAL MAR TEX KAN RCH TAL DAR CLT DOV POC MCH SON
41
KEN DAY NHA IND POC GLN MCH BRI ATL RCH CHI NHA DOV KAN CLT TAL MAR TEX PHO HOM 51st 3 [187]
Daytona 500
Year Team Manufacturer Start Finish Ref
2008 Bill Davis Racing Toyota DNQ [186]

Nationwide Series

NASCAR Nationwide Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 NNSC Pts Ref
2008 Braun Racing 32 Toyota DAY CAL LVS ATL BRI NSH TEX PHO MEX TAL RCH DAR CLT DOV NSH KEB MIL NHA DAY CHI GTY IRP CGV
16
GLN MCH BRI CAL RCH DOV KAN CLT MEM TEX PHO HOM 111th 120 [87]
2009 DAY CAL LVS BRI TEX NSH PHO TAL RCH DAR CLT DOV NSH KEN MIL NHA DAY CHI GTY IRP IOW GLN MCH BRI CGV
4
ATL RCH DOV KAN CAL CLT MEM TEX PHO HOM 107th 165 [95]
2010 DAY CAL LVS BRI NSH PHO TEX TAL RCH DAR DOV CLT NSH KEN ROA
25
NHA DAY CHI GTY IRP IOW GLN
8
MCH BRI CGV
3
ATL RCH DOV KAN CAL CLT GTY TEX PHO HOM 77th 405 [98]
2011 Penske Racing 22 Dodge DAY PHO LVS BRI CAL TEX TAL NSH RCH DAR DOV IOW CLT CHI MCH ROA
3
DAY KEN NHA NSH IRP IOW GLN CGV
27*
BRI ATL RCH CHI DOV KAN CLT TEX PHO HOM 52nd 61 [106]
2012 DAY PHO LVS BRI CAL TEX RCH TAL DAR IOW CLT DOV MCH ROA
6
KEN DAY NHA CHI IND IOW GLN CGV
3*
BRI ATL RCH CHI KEN DOV CLT KAN TEX PHO HOM 49th 82 [110]

Craftsman Truck Series

NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series results
Year Team No. Truck 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 NCTC Pts Ref
2007 Bill Davis Racing 27 Toyota DAY CAL ATL MAR KAN LOW MAN DOV TEX MCH MIL MEM KEN IRP NSH BRI GTY NHA LVS
21
TAL
30
MAR
32
ATL
14
TEX
25
PHO
19
HOM
36
42nd 615 [80]

Canadian Tire Series

NASCAR Canadian Tire Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Rank Points Ref
2009 7 Ford ASE DEL MSP ASE
22
MPS EDM SAS MSP CTR
4
CGV BAR RIS KWA 33rd 257 [92]
2013 24 Dodge MSP DEL MSP ICAR MPS SAS ASE CTR
3*
RIS MSP BAR KWA 43rd 43 [119]
2014 7 Dodge MSP ACD ICAR EIR SAS ASE CTR
24
RIS MSP BAR KWA 60th 20 [127]

Whelen Euro Series – EuroNASCAR PRO

(key) (Bold – Pole position. Italics – Fastest lap. * – Most laps led. ^ – Most positions gained)

NASCAR Whelen Euro Series – EuroNASCAR PRO results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NWES Pts Ref
2019 Go Fas Racing 32 Chevy VAL
11
VAL
25
FRA
3
FRA
3
BRH
15
BRH
8
MOS
22
MOS
19
VEN
3*
HOC
5
HOC
7
ZOL
14
ZOL
7
8th 431 [139]
2020 FEED Vict Racing 5 ITA
16*
ITA
2
ZOL
4
ZOL
19
MOS MOS VAL VAL ESP ESP 21st 104 [141]
2021 Academy Motorsport EuroNASCAR FJ 2020 ESP
7
ESP
9
GBR GBR CZE
11
CZE
4
CRO
3
CRO
17
BEL BEL ITA
1*
ITA
1*
9th 331 [90]

Other stock cars

Speedcar Series

(key)

Speedcar Series results
Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Pos Points
2008 Speedcar Team SEN1 SEN2 SEP1 SEP2 BHR1
6
BHR2
Ret
DUB1
9
DUB2
Ret
14th 3
2008–09 Durango DUB
6
BHR1
10
BHR2
Ret
LOS1
5
LOS2
Ret
DUB1 DUB2 BHR1 BHR2 11th 7
Source:[90]

Stock Car Brasil

Stock Car Brasil results
Year Team Car 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Rank Points
2011 Shell V-Power Racing Peugeot 408 CTB INT RBP VEL CGD RIO INT
18
SAL SCZ LON BSB VEL NC† 0†
2015 Shell Racing Chevrolet Sonic GOI
1

21
RBP
1
RBP
2
VEL
1
VEL
2
CUR
1
CUR
2
SCZ
1
SCZ
2
CUR
1
CUR
2
GOI
1
CAS
1
CAS
2
BRA
1
BRA
2
CUR
1
CUR
2
TAR
1
TAR
2
INT
1
NC† 0†
Source:[90]

† Ineligible for championship points.

Touring cars

V8 Supercars

V8 Supercars results
Year Team Car 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Final Pos Points Ref
2010 Rod Nash Racing Ford FG Falcon YMC
R1
YMC
R2
BHR
R3
BHR
R4
ADE
R5
ADE
R6
HAM
R7
HAM
R8
QLD
R9
QLD
R10
WIN
R11
WIN
R12
HDV
R13
HDV
R14
TOW
R15
TOW
R16
PHI
Q
PHI
R17
BAT
R18
SUR
R19

22
SUR
R20

5
SYM
R21
SYM
R22
SAN
R23
SAN
R24
SYD
R25
SYD
R26
NC 0 † [103]
2012 Kelly Racing Holden VE Commodore ADE
R1
ADE
R2
SYM
R3
SYM
R4
HAM
R5
HAM
R6
BAR
R7
BAR
R8
BAR
R9
PHI
R10
PHI
R11
HID
R12
HID
R13
TOW
R14

Ret
TOW
R15

24
QLD
R16

24
QLD
R17

24
SMP
R18

24
SMP
R19

26
SAN
Q
SAN
R20
BAT
R21
SUR
R22
SUR
R23
YMC
R24
YMC
R25
YMC
R26
WIN
R27
WIN
R28
SYD
R29
SYD
R30
NC 0 † [112]

† Not Eligible for points

Complete FIA World Rallycross Championship results

Supercar results
Year Entrant Car 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 WRX Points
2014 Albatec Racing Peugeot 208 GTi POR
17
GBR NOR
14
FIN
16
SWE
17
BEL
14
CAN
16
FRA GER ITA
18
TUR ARG 37th 8
Sources:[120][122]

Complete Formula E results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Formula E results
Year Team Chassis Powertrain 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Pos Points
2015–16 Venturi Formula E Team Spark SRT01-e Venturi VM200-FE-01 BEI
14
PUT
11
PDE
DNS
BUE MEX LBH PAR BER MSC LDN LDN 20th 0
Sources:[90][133]

Bibliography

Notes

  1. ^ The school had been interested in Villeneuve since his father attended it in the early 1970s. His mother agreed on the condition journalists were not allowed to enter the circuit.[16]
  2. ^ Blocks were fitted onto the car pedals by staff to enable Villeneuve to reach them and sit next to the steering wheel since he is small in stature.[13][17]
  3. ^ His nationality was occasionally presented as either Andorran or Canadian during this period.[19]
  4. ^ Cigarette company Marlboro did not want to sponsor Villeneuve because their management did not want to exploit his name.[18]
  5. ^ A victory for Villeneuve at the final round of the 1990 season at the ACI Vallelunga Circuit was disallowed when he was assessed a one-minute penalty for a jump start.[20]
  6. ^ Green wanted to select the number six but was unable to do so since Villeneuve placed sixth in the 1994 drivers' standings.[25]
  7. ^ Villeneuve was the youngest driver as well as the first Canadian to win both the Indianapolis 500 and the series title.[2]
  8. ^ Williams issued press releases incorrectly saying Villeneuve was eight-tenths of a second slower than Hill.[29]
  9. ^ Lewis Hamilton equalled each of these records driving for McLaren in the 2007 season.[37]
  10. ^ Poor performances in the season's first three races meant Peter Sauber did not guarantee that Villeneuve would continue at Sauber past the San Marino Grand Prix until his fourth-place result allowed him to retain his seat for the remainder of the season.[71]
  11. ^ The Triple Crown of Motorsport consists of the F1 World Championship, the Indianapolis 500 and the 24 Hours of Le Mans.[2]
  12. ^ Villeneuve had planned to make his Cup Series debut at Phoenix but moved it forward five weeks following approval from NASCAR as a result of testing the Car of Tomorrow at Talladega and his performance in the Truck Series round at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. He therefore abandoned plans to race the ARCA and Truck Series events at Talladega.[81]
  13. ^ Paul Morris considered Villeneuve for a full-time drive at Supercheap Auto Racing in the 2009 V8 Supercar Championship Series but a lack of sponsorship prevented his racing in the series.[101]
  14. ^ Villeneuve became aware of a possible entry to the FFSA GT Championship through team owner Christian Petit.[115]
  15. ^ Villeneuve and Cayrolle were entered for the Imola round but the entry failed to arrive.[77]
  16. ^ He had a seat fitting at the team's factory on 20 March.[124]
  17. ^ He previously wore a helmet in the colours of his sponsor Player's.[183]

References

  1. ^ a b c Way, Diane Lois (April 5, 2021). "Jacques Villeneuve; Canadian race-car driver". Encyclopædia Britannica. Archived from the original on May 1, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Gee, Michael (June 9, 2010). "Jacques Villeneuve". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e Donaldson, Gerald. "Jacques Villeneuve – 1997". Formula One. Archived from the original on May 1, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c Sparling 1999, p. 13, 17, 21.
  5. ^ a b c d Wallace, Bruce (June 16, 1997). "Eyes on the Prize". : 36–42. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  6. ^ a b c d e Richler, Jacob (August 24, 1995). "Jacques Attack" (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Ottawa Citizen. pp. 30–34, 84. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  7. ^ a b Collings 1997, p. 37, 39, 80.
  8. ^ a b Deacon, James (August 14, 1995). "In the driver's seat". Maclean's: 44–47. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Hamilton, Maurice (November 2014). "The Maurice Hamilton Interview: Jacques Villeneuve". F1 Racing (United Kingdom ed.) (225): 92–99.
  10. ^ a b Collings 1997, p. 69, 84.
  11. ^ a b c Bartels, Mandy (September 26, 1995). "Jacques Villeneuve – In His Own Tracks". AtlasF1. 1 (14). Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h Cooper, Adam (November 2016). "Lunch with Jacques Villeneuve". Motor Sport. 92 (11): 81–88. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  13. ^ a b c d e Collings 1997, p. 88–93.
  14. ^ Collings 1997, p. 22–26.
  15. ^ a b Hilton 1996, p. 27–32.
  16. ^ Fagnan, René (June 6, 2001). "Jacques Villeneuve's first race... with Honda!". F1-Live. Archived from the original on June 16, 2001. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h Sparling 1999, p. 23–26.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Collings 1997, p. 98–142, 191–192.
  19. ^ Hilton 1996, p. 48.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Jacques Villeneuve". Motor Sport. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d Anderson, Mark (June 1, 1995). "Jacques Villeneuve: superstar". Financial Post: 47–52. ProQuest 223870508. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 2, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  22. ^ Gagnon, François (June 12, 1999). "BAR née d'un accident de parcours: Mandaté pour embaucher l'oncle Villeneuve, Moser a engagé le neveu" [BAR born from a mishap: Mandated to hire uncle Villeneuve, Moser hired the nephew]. Le Soleil (in French). pp. C1–C2. Archived from the original on June 4, 2021. Retrieved June 4, 2021 – via Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec.
  23. ^ a b c "Jacques Villeneuve – Atlantic Stats". Champ Car Stats. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  24. ^ a b c Collings 1997, p. 145–151, 192.
  25. ^ Lecours 1998, p. 239.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Jacques Villeneuve – CART/IndyCar Series Stats". Champ Car Stats. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved June 2, 2021.
  27. ^ a b c d e Sparling 1999, pp. 28–32.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i Collings 1997, pp. 154–163, 167–189.
  29. ^ a b c "Jacques Villeneuve Chez Williams" [Jacques Villeneuve at Williams] (in French). StatsF1. Archived from the original on June 3, 2021. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  30. ^ Newey 2017, p. 236.
  31. ^ a b Collings & Edworthy 2011, pp. 268–277.
  32. ^ a b Camus 2007, p. 187.
  33. ^ a b c Sparling 1999, pp. 44–48.
  34. ^ a b Jacob, K. O. (June 5–18, 1996). "Born to Drive". Sportsworld. 17 (17): 33–36. Retrieved May 31, 2021 – via Internet Archive.
  35. ^ Lecours 1998, p. 251.
  36. ^ Walker & Arron 1996, p. 133.
  37. ^ a b Jones 2015, pp. 18, 22.
  38. ^ a b c d Collings & Edworthy 2011, pp. 268–277, 316, 320.
  39. ^ a b Winner, Christopher (May 8, 1997). "Villeneuve explores limits '95 Indy champ, Formula One driver embraces speed and risk". USA Today. p. C8. ProQuest 408736641. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  40. ^ Camus 2007, p. 207.
  41. ^ a b Sparling 1999, pp. 57–59, 65–71.
  42. ^ "Schumacher, Villeneuve race to the final wire". The Kingston Whig-Standard. October 25, 1997. p. 30. ProQuest 353061826. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 3, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  43. ^ a b Downey 1998, pp. 7, 20, 126.
  44. ^ Sparling 1999, pp. 74–77.
  45. ^ Bernard, Romain (February 10, 2016). "Jacques Villeneuve: "Le respect du risque est quelque chose que j'ai appris de mon père"" [Jacques Villeneuve: "Respect for Risk is Something I Learned from my Father"] (PDF). Auto Hebdo (in French): 48–54. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 4, 2021. Retrieved June 4, 2021.
  46. ^ Hill, Matt (April 18, 2012). "British American Racing in 1999: Debut Season That Was All Hype with No Results". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on May 26, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  47. ^ a b Camus 2007, pp. 233–234.
  48. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve: Starting Over". Auto Racing Digest. 27 (6): 44. November 1999. ISSN 0090-8029.
  49. ^ a b Edwards 1999, pp. 88, 115, 120–127.
  50. ^ a b c d e f Camus 2007, pp. 233–243.
  51. ^ a b c Domenjoz 2000, pp. 40, 50–51, 218.
  52. ^ "No Williams return for Villeneuve". Sports Illustrated. May 29, 2000. Archived from the original on August 23, 2000. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  53. ^ Delbes, Marc (June 15, 2000). "Will Jacques be in a BAR car in 2001?". The Hamilton Spectator. p. OD11. ProQuest 270019260. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  54. ^ "Villeneuve and Button at Benetton?". GrandPrix.com. July 3, 2000. Archived from the original on May 24, 2005. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  55. ^ a b Eason, Kevin (July 14, 2000). "Villeneuve ponders option of taking sabbatical". The Times (66879). p. 31. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021 – via The Times Digital Archive.
  56. ^ "Villeneuve admits McLaren was never an option". Autosport. July 1, 2000. Archived from the original on June 5, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  57. ^ "Jacques no-BAR hopper". Medicine Hat News. The Canadian Press. July 25, 2000. p. A8. Archived from the original on June 5, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021 – via NewspaperArchive.com open access.
  58. ^ "Briatore still eyes Villeneuve". Autosport. August 2, 2000. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  59. ^ a b c Mansell 2001, pp. 60–61, 231–253.
  60. ^ Domenjoz 2001, pp. 28–29, 50–51, 218.
  61. ^ "BAR stick with Villeneuve, Panis". BBC Sport. July 26, 2001. Archived from the original on October 22, 2002. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  62. ^ a b Domenjoz 2002, pp. 30–31, 50–51, 148, 218.
  63. ^ "Villeneuve fed up, may leave BAR". CBC News. April 18, 2002. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  64. ^ "Villeneuve rejects Cart return". BBC Sport. August 27, 2002. Archived from the original on December 21, 2002. Retrieved June 5, 2021.
  65. ^ a b c d Domenjoz 2003, pp. 36–37, 51, 215, 218.
  66. ^ Button 2017, pp. 165–168.
  67. ^ a b c d e f Camus 2007, pp. 245–248.
  68. ^ Hamilton, Graeme (December 13, 2003). "Villeneuve looking south for a new ride". National Post. p. S5. Archived from the original on June 5, 2021. Retrieved June 5, 2021 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  69. ^ a b c d e Domenjoz 2004, pp. 28–29, 50–51, 192, 218.
  70. ^ a b c Camus 2007, pp. 249–250.
  71. ^ Jones 2006, p. 39.
  72. ^ a b c d Camus 2007, pp. 254–256, 261–268.
  73. ^ "Villeneuve: The real reason I left F1". The Sports Network. September 7, 2006. Archived from the original on September 26, 2007. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  74. ^ Pappone, Jeff (December 2, 2006). "Roush wants Villeneuve, but there's a hefty price". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  75. ^ Freeman, Glenn (January 10, 2007). "Peugeot initiated Villeneuve talks". Autosport. Archived from the original on January 28, 2007. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  76. ^ Salisbury, Matt (June 17, 2007). "Race results – Le Mans 24 Hours". Crash. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  77. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Complete Archive of Jacques Villeneuve". Racing Sports Cars. Archived from the original on February 3, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  78. ^ Schwarb, John (August 30, 2007). "Villeneuve following Montoya's footsteps into NASCAR". ESPN. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  79. ^ "Villeneuve to race trucks; may run Nextel Cup in 2008". Detroit Free Press. August 28, 2007. Archived from the original on October 12, 2007. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  80. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2007 NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  81. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve to Race in Nextel Cup, Jeff Gordon Opposes Move". Autoweek. September 27, 2007. Archived from the original on August 7, 2018. Retrieved March 24, 2016.
  82. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2007 NASCAR Nextel Cup Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 12, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  83. ^ McDonald, Norris (February 16, 2008). "Villeneuve loses NASCAR ride". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  84. ^ Pillion, Dennis (April 12, 2008). "Villeneuve's day comes to quick end in Speedcar season finale". The Birmingham News. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  85. ^ "Former F1 champions go head-to-head in Speedcar". Gulf Weekly. April 2, 2008. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  86. ^ Ashenfelter, Mark (July 31, 2008). "Former F1 champ Villeneuve anxious to put on a show for Canadian fans". ESPN. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  87. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2008 NASCAR Nationwide Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 13, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  88. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve Competes in Argentinean Top Race Series". Auto123.com. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
    "Jacques Villeneuve Participera À La Course Top Race En Argentine" [Jacques Villeneuve Will Participate in the Top Race in Argentina] (in French). Auto123.com. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  89. ^ Barstow, Ollie (December 1, 2008). "Durango to tackle Speedcar with Villeneuve". Crash. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  90. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Jacques Villeneuve". DriverDB. Archived from the original on May 1, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  91. ^ Fagnan, René (May 23, 2009). "NASCAR: Jacques Villeneuve will contest a NASCAR Canadian Tire race". Auto123.com. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  92. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2009 NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  93. ^ "Villeneuve en el Top Race" [Villeneuve in the Top Race]. El Popular (in Spanish). June 30, 2009. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  94. ^ Basu, Arpon (August 7, 2009). "Busch sets sights on Villeneuve". The Globe and Mail. The Canadian Press. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  95. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2009 NASCAR Nationwide Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 13, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  96. ^ Mejía, Diego (June 3, 2010). "Villeneuve eighth at Watkins Glen". Autosport. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  97. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve to make NASCAR return". Speedcafe. June 3, 2010. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  98. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2010 NASCAR Nationwide Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 8, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  99. ^ Jenkins, Chris (July 24, 2010). "NASCAR: Villeneuve returns to Indy just in time". The News-Herald. Associated Press. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  100. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2010 NASCAR Sprint Cup Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 13, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  101. ^ Gover, Paul (January 9, 2009). "V8 Villeneuve Formula One champ groomed for Supercars". Herald Sun. p. 78. ProQuest 361144349. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  102. ^ "Villeneuve: Ambrose has given me V8 advice". Speedcafe. October 20, 2010. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2020.
  103. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2010 V8 Supercars Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 7, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  104. ^ C., D. (March 23, 2011). "Jacques Out of GC600". Auto Action (1433): 5.
  105. ^ "Villeneuve to race NASCAR in Montreal". CBC News. Associated Press. May 24, 2011. Archived from the original on July 1, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  106. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2011 NASCAR Nationwide Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 9, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  107. ^ "Villeneuve se preocupa com adaptação na Stock Car" [Villeneuve worries about adaptation in Stock Car]. O Estado de S. Paulo (in Portuguese). Agência Estado. August 4, 2011. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  108. ^ "Thiago Camilo vence Corrida do Milhão; Villeneuve é 18º" [Thiago Camilo wins the Million Race; Villeneuve is 18th] (in Portuguese). Terra. August 7, 2011. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  109. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve to run 2 Nationwide races". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Associated Press. May 17, 2012. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  110. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2012 NASCAR Nationwide Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 14, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  111. ^ Mauk, Eric (July 17, 2012). "Jacques Villenueve to run two more events for Kelly Racing". Motorsport.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  112. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2012 V8 Supercars Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 6, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  113. ^ Fagnan, René (October 29, 2012). "GT: Jacques Villeneuve takes 7th place in Baku street race (+photos)". Auto123.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  114. ^ Inwood, Alex (June 27, 2012). "Nissan Targets Villeneuve". Auto Action (1497): 4–5.
  115. ^ Fagnan, René (May 7, 2013). "GT: Jacques Villeneuve's new challenge (+photos)". Auto123.com. Archived from the original on June 12, 2013. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  116. ^ Fryer, Jenna (June 21, 2013). "NASCAR: Jacques Villeneuve's return not exactly embraced by fellow drivers". Toronto Star. Associated Press. Archived from the original on July 30, 2013. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  117. ^ Gluck, Jeff (June 23, 2013). "Road course 'train wreck' out of Sonoma". USA Today. Archived from the original on July 2, 2013. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  118. ^ Nesbitt, Wally (June 11, 2013). "Villeneuve Joins 22 Racing For the Grand Prix of Trois Rivieres". Inside Track Motorsport News. Archived from the original on November 24, 2020. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  119. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2013 NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 8, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  120. ^ a b Bolton, James (February 13, 2014). "Jacques Villeneuve commits to World Rallycross Championship". Autocar. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  121. ^ a b Horncastle, Rowan (April 28, 2014). "Why is Jacques Villeneuve doing Rallycross?". Top Gear. Archived from the original on August 1, 2016. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  122. ^ a b "2014 Classifications – 2014 FIA World Rallycross Championship". Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. Archived from the original on November 28, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  123. ^ Ridge, Hal (November 19, 2014). "Jacques Villeneuve splits with World RX team ahead of final round". Autosport. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  124. ^ Cavin, Curt (March 27, 2014). "Jacques Back!". Auto Action (1584): 11.
  125. ^ Miller, Robin (February 25, 2014). "IndyCar: Jacques Villeneuve to return to Indy 500 with Schmidt Peterson Motorsports". Racer. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  126. ^ Pappone, Jeff (February 26, 2014). "Jacques Villeneuve returns to driver's seat". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on April 1, 2014. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  127. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2014 NASCAR Canadian Tire Series Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 6, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  128. ^ Butcher, Louis (July 16, 2014). "Villeneuve associé à l'écurie Jacombs à Trois-Rivières" [Villeneuve associated with the Jacombs team in Trois-Rivières]. Le Journal de Montréal (in French). Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  129. ^ "Campeão da F-1, Villeneuve reeditará dupla com Zonta na abertura da Stock" [F-1 champion Villeneuve will reissue duo with Zonta at the opening of Stock] (in Portuguese). Globo Esporte. February 6, 2015. Archived from the original on March 13, 2015. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  130. ^ "Former F1 champion Villeneuve goes electric". Bangkok Post. Agence France-Presse. August 9, 2015. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  131. ^ Barstow, Ollie (August 17, 2015). "Villeneuve: Easy decision to join Formula E". Crash. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  132. ^ Sylt, Christian (September 11, 2015). "Jacques Villeneuve on the Truth About Why He Is Driving in Formula E". Forbes. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  133. ^ a b "Season two review pt4: Jacques Villeneuve". FIA Formula E. July 19, 2016. Archived from the original on October 26, 2016. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  134. ^ Smith, Sam (January 22, 2016). "Exclusive: Villeneuve parts ways with Venturi Formula E team". Motorsport.com. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  135. ^ Fagnan, René (August 2, 2018). "Jacques Villeneuve tests his ARX Rallycross Subaru". Motorsport.com. Archived from the original on September 11, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  136. ^ Ridge, Hal (July 27, 2018). "1997 Formula 1 champion Jacques Villeneuve back to rallycross". Autosport. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  137. ^ Fagnan, René (October 6, 2018). "Jacques Villeneuve stumbles in ARX rallycross semi-final at GP3R". Motorsport.com. Archived from the original on October 11, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  138. ^ Chokhani, Darshan (May 6, 2019). "Villeneuve takes Top 5 finish in Race 2 of Porsche Carrera Cup Scandinavia". DriveTribe. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
    Chokhani, Darshan (August 19, 2019). "Villeneuve scores Top 10 Result in Race 2 of Porsche Carrera Cup Scandinavia". DriveTribe. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  139. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2019 Whelen Euro Elite 1 Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 6, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  140. ^ Guiglia, Gian Luca (December 27, 2019). "Jacques Villeneuve doubles down on NWES, brings FEED Racing to the Grid". NASCAR Whelen Euro Series. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  141. ^ a b "Jacques Villenueve – 2020 EuroNASCAR Pro Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on May 7, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  142. ^ Nyugen, Justin (March 4, 2021). "Jacques Villeneuve joins Academy-Caffi alliance for 2021 EuroNASCAR season". The Checkered Flag. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  143. ^ Elson, James (November 1, 2021). "Jacques Villeneuve wins first race in 13 years – then does it again day after". Motor Sport. Archived from the original on November 1, 2021. Retrieved November 1, 2021.
  144. ^ "2021 EuroNASCAR Pro Championship: Final Classification" (PDF). NASCAR Whelen Euro Series. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 20, 2021. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  145. ^ a b c d Edworthy, Sarah (February 16, 2007). "Sport in my World: Jacques Villeneuve". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  146. ^ a b "Grapevine: Villeneuve releases debut single". Autosport. June 20, 2006. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  147. ^ a b Phillips, Randy (February 20, 2007). "Villeneuve takes new spin as singer". Ottawa Citizen. p. B2. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  148. ^ "Villeneuve emerges from the pits with music career". Irish Examiner. February 24, 2007. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  149. ^ Gill, Alexandra (April 3, 2007). "Jacques Villeneuve sings, just don't call him an artist". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  150. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve n'a vendu que 233 disques" [Jacques Villeneuve only sold 233 records]. La Presse (in French). March 9, 2007. Archived from the original on March 11, 2007. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  151. ^ Bear, Rob (December 12, 2012). "Auto Racing Icon Jacques Villeneuve Lists Remote Cabin". Curbed. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  152. ^ Orr, Frank (June 3, 1995). "Villeneuve trying to adjust to limelight after Indy win". Toronto Star. p. E1. ProQuest 437275113. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021 – via ProQuest.
    Phillips, Randy (June 4, 1998). "'Have you learned anything about hair colour?': Villeneuve in spotlight on the Letterman show". Montreal Gazette. p. C5. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  153. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve". Canada's Walk of Fame. Archived from the original on August 15, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  154. ^ "Racing hero Jacques Villeneuve carries Olympic flame as protests delay Mtl event". The Canadian Press. December 10, 2009. ProQuest 360082246. Archived from the original on September 4, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  155. ^ "2010 Olympic Winter Games officially open". CTV News. February 12, 2010. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  156. ^ Demers, Maxime (May 11, 2011). "Jacques Villeneuve au cinéma" [Jacques Villeneuve at the cinema]. Le Journal de Montréal. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  157. ^ Llewellyn, Craig (May 11, 2012). "Another world champion for Sky team". Crash. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
    Beacon, Bill (June 8, 2012). "Former F1 champ Villeneuve says tight drivers' race fun but based on luck: Villeneuve says F1 wins now luck of the draw". The Canadian Press. ProQuest 1019654780. Archived from the original on September 4, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  158. ^ Cremonesi, Andrea (January 29, 2013). "F.1 in stile Olimpiade Sky torna con 9 canali e la critica di Villeneuve" [Olympics-style F1 Sky returns with 9 channels and Villeneuve's critique]. La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian). Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
    "Villeneuve et Montagny sur Canal +" [Villeneuve and Montagny on Canal +]. Le Figaro (in French). February 28, 2013. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  159. ^ Maloney, Tom (October 27, 2016). "New country club racetrack designed by Jacques Villeneuve opens in B.C." The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on April 8, 2017. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  160. ^ Panzariu, Ovidiu (August 14, 2009). "Jacques Villeneuve Confirms Divorce from Johanna". Auto Evolution. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  161. ^ Martins, Victor (March 19, 2015). "Campeão na Indy e na F1, Villeneuve vê em corrida da Stock Car a mais importante da vida. Foi onde conheceu Camila" [Champion in Indy and F1, Villeneuve sees the most important race of his life in Stock Car racing. That's where she met Camila] (in Portuguese). Grande Prêmio. Archived from the original on March 20, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2021.
  162. ^ Ogweng, Sylvia (January 11, 2017). "Revenue Quebec Places Lien On Jacques Villeneuve's Quebec Homes". Entertainment Tonight Canada. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  163. ^ Zalac, Frédéric (October 27, 2021). "Leaked files expose Jacques Villeneuve's multimillion-dollar tax dodges". CBC News. Archived from the original on October 31, 2021. Retrieved October 31, 2021.
  164. ^ Roebuck, Nigel (June 7, 1998). "More determined than ever". Autoweek. 48 (28): 40.
  165. ^ "F1 needs people like McRae". Eurosport. Reuters. December 11, 2002. Archived from the original on September 4, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  166. ^ "Villeneuve attacks F1 recruiting policy". RTÉ Sport. July 13, 2006. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  167. ^ McRae, Donald (February 27, 2005). "Interview: Jacques Villeneuve". The Guardian. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  168. ^ Windsor, Peter (April 2006). "Old dogs bark louder". F1 Racing (Australian ed.): 54–59.
  169. ^ Clarkson, Tom (July 2000). "Captains courageous". F1 Racing (Australian ed.): 52–57.
  170. ^ Bishop, Matt (September 2000). "Hot property". F1 Racing (Australian ed.): 45.
  171. ^ Wilkins, Robert (October 13, 2000). "Jacques Villeneuve joins GPDA". Crash. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  172. ^ Noble, Jonathan (June 10, 2006). "Villeneuve resigns from the GPDA". Autosport. Archived from the original on September 4, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  173. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve – Auto Racing – 1997". The Lou Marsh Legacy. Archived from the original on November 23, 2018. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  174. ^ "Honours Jacques". Windsor Star. July 13, 1998. p. 33. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved November 24, 2019 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  175. ^ "Villeneuve Receives l'Ordre National du Quebec". AtlasF1. June 9, 1999. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  176. ^ Matsumoto, Rick (June 10, 1998). "Villeneuve takes run at rival Schumacher". Toronto Star. p. 1. ProQuest 437762037. Archived from the original on September 4, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  177. ^ "Hall of Fame – Jacques Villeneuve – Inducted in 2010". Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  178. ^ Shea, Terry (December 7, 2017). "Formula 1 inaugurates its Hall of Fame". Hemmings Motor News. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  179. ^ McDonald, Norris (October 17, 2018). "Canadian Motorsport Hall of Fame Class of 2018 One of the Best". Wheels.ca. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  180. ^ a b Sturm, Booth & Thorpe 2007, p. 206.
  181. ^ Hamilton 2020, p. 187.
  182. ^ Fogarty, Mark (October 11, 2010). "Cross Roads". Auto Action (1416). pp. 17–19.
  183. ^ a b c d Elson, James (December 21, 2020). "Jacques Villeneuve: 'I watched my father Gilles draw his helmet design in our motorhome'". Motor Sport. Archived from the original on January 28, 2021. Retrieved June 7, 2021.
  184. ^ a b c Saunders, Will (April 7, 2015). "Six of the Best: Helmet designs". Crash. Archived from the original on June 8, 2021. Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  185. ^ "All championship race entries, by Jacques Villeneuve". ChicaneF1. p. 1, 2, 3, 4. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  186. ^ a b "Jacques Villeneuve – 2008 NASCAR Sprint Cup Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.
  187. ^ "Jacques Villeneuve – 2013 NASCAR Sprint Cup Results". Racing-Reference. Archived from the original on June 9, 2021. Retrieved June 9, 2021.

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by Indianapolis 500 Winner
1995
Succeeded by
PPG CART Indy Car World Series Champion
1995
Succeeded by
Preceded by Formula One World Champion
1997
Succeeded by
Preceded by Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year
1994
Succeeded by
Indy Car Rookie of the Year
1994
Succeeded by
Preceded by Lorenzo Bandini Trophy
1996
Succeeded by
Preceded by Hawthorn Memorial Trophy
1997
Succeeded by
Autosport International Racing Driver Award
1997
Succeeded by
Records
Preceded by Most wins in first Formula One season
4 wins

1996, tied with:
Lewis Hamilton (2007)
Succeeded by
Co-Incumbent