The Las Vegas Village was an open-air venue located on the Las Vegas Strip on Las Vegas Boulevard in Paradise, Nevada. Opened in 2013 as MGM Resorts Village, the venue was 15 acres (6.1 ha) and owned by MGM Resorts International.

The village was the site of the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, which resulted in its closing. It was converted into parking space for Allegiant Stadium in 2019.

History

Located across the street from Luxor Las Vegas, the property was previously a parking lot owned by Mandalay Resort Group until MGM Resorts International purchased the company in 2004.[1] The area became a concert venue and opened in 2013 as MGM Resorts Village, hosting the iHeartRadio Music Festival's Daytime Village—an outdoor counterpart to the main event—on September 20–21, 2013.[2][3]

The village held the inaugural Route 91 Harvest music festival, a collaboration between MGM and Live Nation Entertainment, on October 3–5, 2014.[4]

The Stadium Super Trucks racing series competed on the property in 2014 and 2015 as the final race weekends of each season; the first year was held in conjunction with SEMA and also featured other racing divisions like legends cars.[5][6] Robby Gordon and Sheldon Creed won every race in both years.[7][8]

On October 1, 2015, the venue's name was changed to Las Vegas Village to reduce MGM's influence on the site and its marketing potential.[9]

During the 2017 Route 91 Harvest on October 1, Stephen Paddock fired on attendees in the village from the nearby Mandalay Bay Hotel, killing 60 people and injuring 488. The mass shooting, which was the deadliest in the United States by an individual, resulted in Route 91 being canceled for 2018;[10] as of 2021, the festival has not returned. The iHeartRadio Music Festival was relocated to the Las Vegas Festival Grounds.[11]

The area was fenced off and remained vacant as MGM deliberated plans for the site's future.[12] In September 2019, MGM announced the village would be converted into parking space for Allegiant Stadium and a community center.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Segall, Eli (October 20, 2017). "Site of Las Vegas shooting faces a cloudy future". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  2. ^ Katsilometes, John (September 19, 2014). "MGM Resorts Village is the playground for iHeartRadio Music Festival". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  3. ^ Hayes, Chanelle (September 11, 2015). "iHeartRadio Music Festival features all the hits in one spot". Las Vegas Magazine. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  4. ^ "Inaugural Route 91 Harvest Takes Root Among The Neon As First Country Music Festival Ever To Launch In Las Vegas". MGM Resorts International (Press release). July 17, 2014. Archived from the original on April 23, 2015. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  5. ^ "Stadium Super Trucks Partners with SEMA, Moves Las Vegas Race to Nov. 6". Stadium Super Trucks. October 29, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  6. ^ "Super Trucks race under the lights of the Strip — PHOTOS". Las Vegas Review-Journal. November 5, 2015. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  7. ^ "Sin City Stadium Super Trucks Showdown". Toyo Tires. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  8. ^ "Creed wins Super Trucks title in Las Vegas". Speedcafe. November 6, 2015. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  9. ^ Katsilometes, John (October 1, 2015). "No MGM Resorts: It's now Las Vegas Village and Las Vegas Festival Grounds". Las Vegas Sun. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  10. ^ Gray, Mark (December 13, 2018). "Route 91 Harvest Festival Eyes 2019 Return to Las Vegas". Rolling Stone. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  11. ^ Katsilometes, John (May 1, 2018). "iHeartRadio ready to return outdoor festivals to the Strip". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  12. ^ Darrow, Max (October 1, 2019). "Two years later, One October shooting site will soon transform". KSNV. Retrieved July 25, 2021.
  13. ^ Katsilometes, John (September 3, 2019). "Las Vegas shooting site being converted to community center, parking lot". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved July 25, 2021.