MG P type

A technical overview and history of the MG P type

MG P-Type
Manufacturer MG Car Company
Production1934-1936
2500 made
PredecessorMG J-Type Midget
SuccessorMG TA Midget
Classsports car
Body styles2-door roadster
Airline coupé
Wheelbase87.25 in (2216 mm)
Length131 in (3327 mm)
Width52.5 in (1334 mm)
The MG P Type was produced by the MG Car company from 1934 to 1936. This 2 door sports car used an updated version of the overhead camshaft, crossflow engine, used in the 1928 Morris Minor and Wolseley 10 and previously fitted in the MG J type Midget of 1932 to 1934, driving the rear wheels through a four speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was a strengthened and slightly longer version of that used in the J-Type with suspension by half elliptic springs all round with rigid front and rear axles. Steering was initially by a Marles Weller and later a Bishop Cam system. The two-seat car had a wheelbase of 87 inches (2210 mm) and a track of 42 inches (1067 mm). Most cars were open two seaters but streamlined Airline coupé bodies were also made. The P-type was also available as a four-seater; a car that suffered from a lack of power and poor rear ground clearance. Whereas J, K and L-type MGs differentiated between versions with the use of numbers, with 1 indicating a four seater (i.e. J1) and 2 a two-seater (i.e. J2), this was not the case with the P (or its sister six-cylinder Magnette, the N), and there is no clue to the type in the name
MG PA
Production1934-1935
2000 made
Engine(s)847 cc

The first version, the PA used an 847 cc engine similar to the one on the J-Type but now with a 3 bearing crankshaft, larger camshaft and twin SU carburettors. It produced 36 bhp (27 kW) at 5500 rpm. 

The PB produced from 1935 had a bigger 939 cc engine made by enlarging the bore from 57 to 60 mm and this increased the output to 43 bhp (32 kW). Externally the versions are very similar, the main difference being the radiator grille, where the PA has a honeycomb and the PB has vertical slats. The other obvious difference is in the design and material of the standard dashboard.

2000 of the PA and 526 of the PB were made. In 1935 a PA open two seater cost £222.

MG PB
Production1935-1936
526 made
Engine(s)939 cc

The PB produced from 1935 had a bigger 939 cc engine made by enlarging the bore from 57 to 60 mm and this increased the output to 43 bhp (32 kW). Externally the versions are very similar, the main difference being the radiator grille, where the PA has a honeycomb and the PB has vertical slats. The other obvious difference is in the design and material of the standard dashboard.

A brief history courtesy of Wikipedia

MG P-type

The MG P-type is a sports car that was produced by MG from 1934 to 1936. This 2-door sports car used an updated version of the Wolseley Motors-designed and made overhead camshaft, crossflow engine, used in the 1928 Morris Minor and previously fitted in the J-type Midget of 1932 to 1934, driving the rear wheels through a four-speed non-synchromesh gearbox. The chassis was a strengthened and slightly longer version of that used in the J-type with suspension by half-elliptic springs all round with rigid front and rear axles. Steering was initially by a Marles Weller and later a Bishop Cam system. The two-seat car had a wheelbase of 87 inches (2210 mm) and a track of 42 inches (1067 mm). Most cars were open two seaters, but streamlined Airline coupé bodies were also made. The P-type was also available as a four-seater, a car that suffered from a lack of power and poor rear ground clearance. Whereas J, K and L-type MGs differentiated between versions with the use of numbers, with 1 indicating a four-seater (i.e., J1) and 2 a two-seater (i.e., J2), this was not the case with the P-type (or its six-cylinder sister, the N-type Magnette), and there is no clue to the type in the name.

MG PA

The first PA used an 847 cc (51.7 cu in) engine similar to the J-Type's, now with a 3-bearing crankshaft, improved camshaft, and twin OM-model SU carburettors. It produced 36 bhp (27 kW) at 5,500 rpm. In 1935, a two-seater roadster cost £222. Around 2,000 PAs were made.[2]

MG PB

1936 MG PB

The PB produced from 1935 had a bigger 939 cc engine made by enlarging the bore from 57 to 60 mm and this increased the output to 43 bhp (32 kW). Externally the versions are very similar, the main difference being the radiator grille, where the PA has a honeycomb and the PB has vertical slats. The other obvious difference is in the design and material of the standard dashboard.

526 examples of the PB were produced.[2]

In 1936 a supercharged MG PB driven by Andrew Hutchinson won the Limerick Grand Prix.

References

  • MG Sportscars. Malcolm Green. CLB International. 1997 ISBN 1-85833-606-6
  • A-Z of Cars of the 1930s. Michael Sedgwick and Mark Gillies. Bay View Books. 1989. ISBN 1-870979-38-9
  1. ^ a b c Culshaw; Horrobin (1974). Complete Catalogue of British Cars. London: Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-16689-2.
  2. ^ a b Sedgwick, M. (1989). A-Z of Cars of the 1930s. Devon, UK: Bay View Books. ISBN 1-870979-38-9.

External links

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/international-grand-prix-2