Lancia Lambda

The Lancia Lambda is an innovative automobile produced from 1922 through 1931. It was the first car to feature a load-bearing unitary body, (but without a stressed roof) and it also pioneered the use of an independent suspension (the front sliding pillar with coil springs).[1][2] Vincenzo Lancia even invented a shock absorber for the car and it had excellent four wheel brakes. Approximately 11,200 Lambdas were produced.

Nine versions of the Lambda were built:

  • 1st series, produced 1923, 400 built.
  • 2nd series, produced between 1923 and 1924, 1,100 built. Minor modifications for engine.
  • 3rd series, produced 1924, 800 built. Engine modified.
  • 4th series, produced between 1924 and 1925, 850 built. Modified windscreen.
  • 5th series, produced 1925, 1,050 built. 4-speed gearbox.
  • 6th series, produced between 1925 and 1926, 1,300 built. Car is sold now with bare chassis and with two wheelbases.
  • 7th series, produced between 1926 and 1928, 3,100 built. New bigger engine.
  • 8th series, produced between 1928 and 1930, 3,903 built. Again bigger engine.
  • 9th series, produced 1931, 500 built. Last series sold only bare chassis.

Engines

The narrow-angle aluminium Lancia V4 engine was also notable. All three displacements shared the same long 120 mm (4.7 in) stroke, and all were SOHC designs with a single camshaft serving both banks of cylinders. The first engine had a 13° V angle, the second 14° and the third 13° 40'.

Model Engine Displacement Power Fuel system
S.1-S.6 V4 SOHC 2121 cc 49 hp (36.5 kW) @ 3250 rpm single carburetor
S.7 V4 SOHC 2375 cc 59 hp (44 kW) @ 3250 rpm single carburetor
S.8-S.9 V4 SOHC 2569 cc 69 hp (51.5 kW) @ 3500 rpm single carburetor

Gallery

References

  • Ray Bonds (2003). The Illustrated Directory of Sports Cars. Motorbooks. ISBN 0-7603-1420-9.
  • Lancia by Michael Frostick, 1976. ISBN 0-901564-22-2
  1. ^ "Autos Without Axles Promise Easier Riding" ''Popular Mechanics'', April 1932. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2015-08-23.
  2. ^ Setright, L. J. K. (1976). "Overdrive". In Ian Ward (ed.). Anatomy of the Motor Car. Orbis. p. 159. ISBN 0-85613-230-6.

External links